Steal This Idea

Andre's Kitchen

July 13, 2019 Season 1 Episode 1
Steal This Idea
Andre's Kitchen
Chapters
Steal This Idea
Andre's Kitchen
Jul 13, 2019 Season 1 Episode 1
Andre & Scott
In this episode, Scott and Andre debut with one of our biggest ideas yet: Andre's Kitchen. Plus, an edition of Steal this Screenplay, Speedround, and Good Idea/Bad Idea.
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, Scott and Andre debut with one of our biggest ideas yet: Andre's Kitchen. Plus, an edition of Steal this Screenplay, Speedround, and Good Idea/Bad Idea.



Speaker 1:
0:01
You're listening to steal this idea of the only podcast that follows OJ Simpson on Twitter.
Speaker 2:
0:05
And so I guess just steal it. Steal the safe. Yes. Steal this idea. Still this idea. Still keep doing right now. Steal this idea and I'm going to steal this idea. Ideas tell you right now to beat, to steal. Decide.
Speaker 1:
0:34
Welcome back. Everyone steal this idea. Yes, Andre Scott, we're here. A lot of listeners I imagine have just migrated from extra Guac, a million millions listeners, uh, have now suddenly migrated over to this podcast legions. So for those who don't know, it's still this idea. This is a podcast that me and Andre have just created. This is the episode one, and this podcast is where we are just shy of genius business entrepreneurs. But the problem is we don't have the time of the day, no way to flesh out these ideas to fund them. And so what we've done is we've really out of charity, I would say I made this podcast as a gift to the people exactly where we were. Creative losers created lasers. If you're an entrepreneur, you got all this time, you got all this money. If you're a trust fund, if you're a trust fund baby, Oh yeah, you got money in the bank and you just need that one.
Speaker 1:
1:33
Good idea. This is the podcast for you. Or even if you just, you know, you're an idea person yourself. You love, you know, fun new ideas. Um, so, so we have a couple different segments we'll go through, but, but the meat of every episode, one of us will present a what we would consider a very good idea and the other person we try and sell them on it. And then really if anybody listening wants to make this, you know, take it, run with it. Like we give you permission to steal this idea. Yes. We would hope, you know, there's some, some kind souls out there. If you happen to become a millionaire for one of these, maybe keep kick us a thank you. Check back. Thank you. Checking. Yeah, I'll, I'll, stock options are fine as well. You know, low risk. Um, so before we get into the meat of the episode, uh, again, my name is Scott Knutson.
Speaker 1:
2:14
Uh, you probably have heard of me from extra Guac. Surely, uh, you've probably heard of, of the cohost Andre Washington. Um, if you'd watch twilight breaking dawn, part two, he's an extra in that. That's right. Uh, the 2016 summer Olympics. He was, uh, in the swimming. Uh, was it the breaststroke or freestyle? Freestyle. Yeah, that's right. They happen freestyle. And if you're also in the debate scene, there's a good chance you've heard huge, huge in the debates. Legendary. Yes. Um, so yeah, so we are, we are pseudo entrepreneurs, uh, self self titled Geniuses. Uh, and yeah, I think, I think let's, before we hop into a, I've got a really good idea. I think I'm going to win over Andrea on this one. Uh, before let's, let's do a little segment. We call it. Good idea, bad idea. I love this concept. Behind this is we are marketed to constantly, um, and there's good ideas, there's bad ideas, uh, and we wanna discuss those kind of a short form.
Speaker 1:
3:08
Uh, what's this, is this product, is this gadget, is the thing really gonna take off or is this just a piece of crap under you? You start off, what's, what's a good idea about it you've seen? So I got an Instagram ad the other week for the Crunch Cup, the world's greatest portable cereal cup. Um, and everybody seemed to really hyped on this. I think the Instagram a group message that Scott Inn RN a, it was going off on how Austin is product is. And um, I'm curious, I'm, I want to hear your thoughts. So basically the concept is that it's a cup that has a cereal compartment and a milk compartment, almost like a blender bottle. And as you drink out of the cup, milk meets cereal as it enters your mouth. Oh yeah. That's my understanding. It's, it's almost, it looks like a futuristic, uh, device of some sort.
Speaker 1:
3:58
Uh, I was under the impression that, that the, the, all the, the only point of it was basically just a way to keep both in a consolidated smart. And so like you untwist it and then dump it in. Now you've got no, you're not playing the wrong side. Okay. So, so that's, that was my initial impression was like, oh, like what a convenient way to carry both cereal milk and not know. Totally get you. So if you're listening at home, look it up. It's called the crunch cop. But I'll give you the quick synopsis. It's basically a huge cup with a center, a column that starts cereal and then in the bottom, uh, area for milk. And as you tilt it towards your mouth, milk comes out of one hole. Cereal comes out of the other hole and you get basically cereal happening here. Your mouth is the ball in the end and it says the cereal and milk don't meet until they hit your mouth.
Speaker 1:
4:48
That is amazing. I think, I mean, I, not to poke holes in the idea that I brought, but a horrible idea. Uh, the reason being that one, I and I, I don't eat a lot of cereal. I'm not necessarily a person. I used to grow up on cereal. I think a lot of people are cereal people. So maybe I am just the wrong audience. But to me, I don't want like you had to have that like three to five seconds of marination. Sure. The cereal isn't intolerably punchy and hard. There's only one cereal that would have the exception. And that's pretty pebbles where it's like, yeah, like that's poor ish. Uh, yeah. I don't think it's a good idea. I grew up a cereal guy and I, I get what they're going for here, which is like, oh look how convenient. Like this makes us the longevity of the bullets hero.
Speaker 1:
5:38
But I think a big part of cereal eating is, I know my ratio, right? The milk, my wife's milk, the cereal ratio is insane to me. It's like high cereal or high milk. Hi. No, hi cereal. It's like a bowl of cereal, like a teaspoon of milk like this. There's no milk in there. I'm like, that's not cereal. It's a really weird behavior. Yeah. I talked to your wife, I believe slightly wet cereal is what that is. Yeah, I was, I'm, I'm the opposite. I like it as much milk as possible and then keep filling that milk up until you get a good second. And I would see myself as a 50, 50 person. I want a nice wet cereal there. Right. And uh, so to me this product is very, very dumb. Thumbs down from Andre. I probably said bad idea. Yeah. I think, um, they met their goal on Kickstarter though, so I bet people feel differently.
Speaker 1:
6:32
All right, well I've got an idea for here. Okay. Pitch to me. [inaudible] yes. Uh, maybe you've seen this whole, this one's called eyes on board. Eyes on board. Have not heard of it. I don't think so. The, the, the premise behind this is that clearly there's an epidemic of people who are doing motion sick in the car or train. And so these are glasses that you can wear that eliminate motion sickness when you're reading. Now, in theory, that sounds okay. Maybe that's not the worst thing, but let me just give you a visual. Let me show you a picture. Oh my gosh. These look like for those who can't see this. Um, if you could imagine, um, life preservers Boone's of four of them, two around your eyes and then two on the side, like the ugliest glasses that you could ever imagine. So is there any insight into what the sciences, because yes, I look at that and I think complete crackpot idea, there's no way that works.
Speaker 1:
7:23
So on the inside of these rings is a liquid that like it as you, as you turn, it's like, it's like an a level somehow having those in your peripheral like level sets you so you don't get motion sick, I guess. Bad idea. Horrible. And here's the thing though, is way beyond just that they aren't clearly are not a fashion accessory. They look stupid. I would be so embarrassed to be wearing those on any train in any country. Uh, but beyond that is, it's just like almost a specialty metal trickled device where it's like if your motion sickness is so bad, you're willing to wear that. You should see a doctor and get a pill to go. And if it's so minor that it isn't bad like that. If it's, if it's minor to the point that you haven't already seen a doctor, then you should just take something over the counter.
Speaker 1:
8:15
Right? There's no world where anybody should get specialty glasses for dealing with motion sickness that look like that. And you know, you should do, if you could emotionally stop reading, subbing on your phone, also check what the things that are so many solutions to motion sickness beyond crazy glasses. Yeah. So maybe, maybe it's a much broader epidemic than we're aware of. Fear. Feel free to tweet it or email and let us know. Motion sickness I think is a weird category where, um, you just, I don't know a lot of people with severe motion sickness beyond like boats. Right? I almost feel like it's like, I wonder if we'll see a raise in the same way that like erectile dysfunction was like, yeah, it's really a problem. Or you just like telling everybody so suddenly something, I'm getting an ad for it. It's like, what's going on?
Speaker 1:
8:59
Do I have roots? I don't know. Maybe I should talk to my doctor about this now. I actually could see that. I could see myself next time I'm reading in a car thinking like, wow, I'm actually getting really motion sick only because of this conversation. Well, we had two bad ideas today. Maybe next episode we'll do two. Good. I'm going to try and come with something good next time. Um, all right, let's move on to the meat of the episode here. This is a, uh, the official steal this idea. Now this is an idea that, let me paint that. Let me paint this time here for ya. Going into my mental theater, we, we had a discussion just the other day. My wife texted me, she was very flustered about having to cook dinner. Yes. We've all spouses. We've all gone through that experience of, ah, I don't know what to cook.
Speaker 1:
9:42
Uh Huh. Now the problem is once you hit about six o'clock, which is general dinner time, your options for eating quickly start to go down very drastically, right? So if I'm with my family and I want to go out, I have to go to, let's say all of garden or some sit down restaurants. So I've got to drive there half an hour. Then I gotta wait for my food order. Right? That's it. So now I'm not eating until eight. Totally. So, and it's expensive. Agreed. So the alternative is fast food, right? It's pizza, it's McDonald's. It's not good for me. It is making us fat. Yes. So what I am proposing here, Andrea, is a little, a little storefront, a little brick and mortar called Andre's kitchen. Now the idea here, Andre, is when you call a new order Andre's kitchen, the first thing they're going to tell you to do is turn your, your stove to 350 degrees to preheat it, right?
Speaker 1:
10:33
And you're going to drive as it preheats to hundreds kitchen. Okay? Now, now with the nodders Christians, you're going to have basically like a cookie sheet in meals where there's going to have a protein and a vegetable. And aside already, they've been made all day and every day you might have like a new different recipe or whatever, but they have a steak and potatoes and a salad or enrolls or something like that. And so when you go to drive through to pick it up, I hand you basically a cookie sheet with almost prepared food and all you have to do is just put it in your oven.
Speaker 1:
11:04
Brilliant. I think actually a really good idea and I was pretty turned off because where I thought you were going with this was like Andres kitchen, it's a healthy food place that's open 24 hours. I was like, okay, that is not unique in the slightest. Absolute ticket to an interesting place. I like it. I think that things that are hot right now, uh, meal prep. So what you're talking about, like one sheet dinners are super popular actually. Right? Exactly. But you don't, but you hit six o'clock and it's like, I can't, I gotta go to the grocery store. Even in a world where you're super into the sheet pan dinner concept, you're like two hours out from having dinner at that point you have to prep it. I still have to buy it and cut it, which sucks. This is what, this is what a Papa Papa Murphy's is to pizza.
Speaker 1:
11:49
Right. As what like dinner is, you know where it's like that's a great analysis is Papa Murphy's but for for regular dinner. Yeah, I think really, really good idea. I think that where I see holes particularly is just around like location availability because the concept of like I'm in a preheat, my oven probably takes 15 minutes to preheat to 350 degrees. So the odds that there's an undress kitchen and then 15 minutes of every American super low, but the idea really of almost anywhere on my drive home that I could stop and pick up a meal that I would just put in the oven. Pre-Marinated chick is insane and it would be so, so good. It's basically a bag. It's a salad kit. Yeah. It's maybe it's a preseason roll or like almost ready to go roles or whatever. And I think really the reason that, uh, hello fresh and blue apron like took off is this idea of like, oh, I, I would rather cook, but like, I don't know what to do.
Speaker 1:
12:46
You know, I don't know what to order. And so, and so I think you'd have four proteins. You have a fish, the chicken, a steak and a pork option, and then you'd have two options of vegetables and one third option in a drink. Yeah. The other advantage is that because you're not actually cooking it, you don't really need a full kitchen. You're just doing what's your prep work. So like you're cutting out, like you could do it in a pretty small storefront with limited people. Yeah, no, what I'm picturing is close to like the crumble model where it's really so crumble as a local cookie company. There's a bunch of them. They're all over the country. But um, the concept is just like, you drop in, you pick up a cookie, there's no, there's like maybe one table to sit at. It's like a papa Murphy's kind of situation.
Speaker 1:
13:30
Wait. It's like you're waiting five minutes, you're behind two people. And I think there's some ways to iterate on that too. Right? Where it's just to start frying. All they're doing is meal prep all day. And it's also like maybe you can move into lunch. I think it's really a dinner play for sure. And maybe, I mean maybe on Mother's Day, sure you have like a special pickup, your brunch for tomorrow kind of situation, but the primary place clearly dinner and then I think it just rotates, right? It's like, oh what's what's plan at Andre's kitchen this week? Almost like an escape room. It's like what's the, what's the, what's the menu of the month? Yeah, exactly. And that's what I'm picking up and that sounds awesome. So, so the hard thing, so the two art things I see with this one is price point. Like finding that sweet spot of like I'm about to drop 40 bucks on a meal.
Speaker 1:
14:13
Is that like, even though I know it's worth it, like I would normally spend that at a grocery store, but like it feels different, right? Cause I'm getting all this other stuff. Like you don't realize the cost of your meal at a grocery store usually. And compared to like taking the takeout, it's like wait, it's going to be much more expensive. And so finding that price point, I think it's going to be really tricky. Right? Cause cause cause cause it's a margin play at that point. Like what, how do I make money by selling enough of these, you know, cause cause of the cookie join, you know, or even at Papa Murphy's, the reason that works is because the over hundred pizzas, he, the markup is huge. Their costs per dish is really low. So like that's gonna be a play there. It's like figuring out the right cost model.
Speaker 1:
14:54
Uh, and then, and then of course marketing that, right. Like do I on your way home? Like is my first thought to pick up Andre's kitchen? Or as my first thought, I'm just going to chick flay again. You know, is it too much? Here's the thing. So I'm doing the opposite of [inaudible] on the podcast where I just said beat Scott's idea. The reality is it's hard to be, and here's a couple of my thoughts is one, we know that the demand is already there to like have something that isn't just chick-fil-a again, right? And so in a world where I could even picture a world or I could drive through to this place and then just pop it into the oven when I get home. Such a no brainer, right? Here's the second base is pricing. Totally get it. Definitely a tricky issue. But I think let's say as an entrepreneur, I went into it with one goal and the goal is just to beat the price per meal on Blue Apron.
Speaker 1:
15:37
Right? Let's say that that's the competitor. I think even with a low volume storefront, we're in a world where it's not billions of franchises. Sure you can beat the price because you don't have to ship them the meal. They come to you. It's true. You don't have to package a million. Like if for example, blue river, it's ridiculous. They packaged this like tiny little thing of ranch and they put a sticker that says ranch on it. Um, in this world it's like nothing is proportionate or it's proportion, but it's not packaged that way. It's literally like a sheet that you hand the customer and they go home and put it in the oven. I think it's not that hard. Even you hit a certain customer volume and you can beat like the price per serving of those huge services and that presumably even offer a better product because you don't have to ship somebody like fresher meat because blue apron like ships you something that's been vacuum sealed.
Speaker 1:
16:27
Sure. Fresher produce, fresher meat, uh, less waste. Like there's definitely an environmental play, which is just in a local like, hey, this is sourced locally. Organic like, I mean you can tap into which is the very hot, I think like it's, it's a tough idea to beat. I think that there definitely are questions around like food safety and compliance around like selling people meat or something. Sure. Yeah. And, and the, this idea of like, like the reason that I'm not starting under his kitchen, it's like, it feels like a lot of work to get off the ground. Oh, it would be impossible for somebody that, but if you, like if you, if you're a restaurant, if you have a food truck and you're like, no, I already doing this. I would say like pivot away from Irish Taco food truck and pivot into like store front, you know, we're like, yeah, you're gonna pay, you know, however much for rental and good contacts.
Speaker 1:
17:16
Like my mom works for a company in Salt Lake called Wasatch fresh and similar concept. They basically similar to a, like freshly, they basically have a list of customers. They make a meal every day. They deliver the meal to chores, hire people or older people that don't want to cook. It's a great meal. Um, but it's at a certain price point where it's already, it's basically it's a reheat situation, not as though the cook cooks a scratch situation. Um, and they basically just have a kitchen. They make meals all day. They run out and deliver meals. Uh, is really similar. Yeah. From like a business perspective. But the customer comes to you. I doubt. I don't think there's a delivery play at all. It stops making sense. If it's like a door dash situation. Sure. Uh, and maybe down the road maybe you might find there is a certain type of meal that works really well in this scenario.
Speaker 1:
18:04
But yeah, I think for the same reason that like Papa Murphy's makes a deliberate decision not to delay it, to deliver. It's because they make money by having you drive to them. Right? Like I don't have to wait, I don't have to hire drivers. Exactly. Yeah. I have to have two guys at the Murphy's literally proves the business model, which is just like, people will pick something up on their way home. It's a higher quality product than when you get a pizza hut. It doesn't take two hours to get to your house and it tastes good. And if you take it and you can even, you could even buy it and not cook it that night. You can cook it the next night. So there's this idea of like, I might pick this, I buy three. Yeah. And I just put them in my, or I buy one and I, I, you know, this is, this is the base to a bigger meal and I'm going to bake my own sides for tomorrow or whatever.
Speaker 1:
18:50
Let feel pretty good about around one here. Andre. That was solid. You're gonna have to bring some big guns next episode. No, like, that was really good. All right, let's do a quick speed round. Um, speed round is going to be kind of pop culture. Going to be, uh, general things. Um, one sentence, kind of shoot it up, shoot it down if we think this is a good idea, bad idea. Kind of the very quick and dirty. Why this is good. Why this is stupid. Yes. Um, so I've got a couple here. Um, first one, easy one. Robert Paterson is Batman. Good idea. Bad idea, bad idea. Robert Pattinson is definitely in the category of actors that like Daniel Radcliffe will always be known for one role. Sure. I think it's really, really difficult to divorce them from, maybe that's coming from somebody that doesn't, you don't think he could pull heath ledger.
Speaker 1:
19:37
And, and while he'd would definitely wouldn't be playing heath ledger rot in the sense that like heath ledger was a, up until dark guy was kind of typecast a little bit into romcoms yeah. And then moved into a very dark and was, I mean, I think, here's the thing I, joker I think is, but maybe Batman has the same play a joker almost anybody could be in the role. And because of the like intense costumes Shirl it's like, I don't even know who I'm looking at. And that's fair. And actually has the same thing though. I mean, Scott, I'm asking a Batman movie, what percentage is that man unmasked? Sure. I mean, I mean, at that point, at that point, it's Bruce Wayne, right? Like, like I would argue like people give Ben Affleck a pretty bad time. I think he's like a decent Bruce Wayne. I don't really, yeah, I don't agree with the Ben Affleck hate at all.
Speaker 1:
20:22
Yeah. As a Batman, I think he's like, no, he's okay. He's just as good as most people. But like where's conversely, I think Christian Bale is not a, a great, uh, Bruce Wayne. No personally really bad opinion, but I guess that's fine. Uh, okay. Next one here. I'm a the macbook pro starting at $6,000. Good idea. I mean apple, here's the thing. Every apple release, people are up in arms about the, of apple products. This has been talked about ad if tonight and then people will buy them anyway. You know, I think like the Mac pro has always been a clearly a luxury product. Even way more than a Mac book or Mac book air or any of those things. If you are the kind of person that's going to invest in a Mac pro, it doesn't matter if it's $8,000, you'll pay it. Definitely see it.
Speaker 1:
21:10
Like caters right into their brand of like, we make nice stuff every, you know, everybody uses our stuff and it makes the average consumer who probably won't buy the macropro want to buy any iteration back. It's like, oh, well it comes from this really great thing. So I get it. Yeah. Um, call of duty modern warfare being called call of duty, modern warfare. That's it. Even though this is the fourth call of duty modern warfare. So not a call, not, not a crazy call of duty person and sure stuff like you could tell me that we were on three and I'd be like, yeah, that's the, this is this, this is the what makes it interesting. So called duty. Yes. One, two and three called duty for was called call of duty four modern warfare. Right. And then they made the spinoff of what a warfare.
Speaker 1:
21:52
So there was modern call of duty, modern warfare to cause you to want to wear it for three. And then they had another spinoff in the black ops series. Right. And then the tried to do a few other spinoffs into like infinite warfare and goes, none of them panned out. Yes. And so now this is the fourth call duty modern warfare, but it's just called call of duty. Modern warfare. That's, it doesn't make sense. None if, if they have like unique franchise lines, which I know they do. I played black ops for, so I'm not a complete idiot out of the, no, exactly. I'm in the know I'm video games. Not a good idea. It will confuse people all you want. You want clear and precise product lines. That seems obvious. I get the intent of like the modern warfare brand very strong and they want to tap into that, but I think it would have been better to just call it modern warfare five or four, whatever.
Speaker 1:
22:41
Like here's, I mean we have the situation with the iPhone to where it's like when did the numbers and when do we do something different. Right. And I kind of, because they kind of do that with the Mac book where it's just like, it's just the 2018 Mac book now. And then like, I wonder if we're at that point where they don't want to do that though. Cause then it's like you're basically creating Madden gamps. It's just like nothing is nail. You're just slapping a new number on it every year. Yeah. I think you want to avoid that. Uh, last one year space jam too with Lebron James. Bad idea. Bad idea. Oh, I started this actually the first time hearing of this, so I need to do a better job of reading before I get on this, but a Lebron James doesn't make sense. Really? No, it did.
Speaker 1:
23:21
Definitely doesn't. James is like controversial figure. He is, but he's like a pretty prolific, I mean he's probably the most prolific, best player on this current iteration. It's, it's a freaking loony things to me. It doesn't, it's not like a hall of fame thing. I don't think it matters how prolific the basketball player is. Space Jam will forever live in the memory of nineties kids, two thousands kids. As an amazing film. You don't think it holds up. Let's not spoil the legacy by creating too by trying to franchise doesn't make sense. You're saying don't make tee tee to [inaudible]. Exactly is let's just let space jam be what it is. Let's not try to iterate an amazing formula. Let's just let it be. Let it be. I definitely not with Lebron James. I think that's so stupid. I think it almost would have been better to say space jam to a different sport.
Speaker 1:
24:07
Like, oh, like air bud, like first, right. You're getting everybody but to, I'm just trying to think of equally spaced chance to Peyton manning. Like I don't really know what that would look like. A Tom Brady like space touchdown space with paint, paint, paint man who would actually be good because he's like barely retired. Kind of like Michael Jordan was like, yeah, it has to be, we've got to bring back pain manning to throw the football in space or whatever. Yeah. So I think there's, there's options there. Not The option that they, interesting. Yeah. I can't see this. Also. Looney tunes are dead, so it's time to really, really get past that. All right, last segment or do you want to cut it off? Uh, we do our 24 minutes here. Last segment is still the screenplay. 24 minutes. We're making good time. We're making good time.
Speaker 1:
25:02
Yeah. Um, still the screenplay, uh, love this concept. So basically we've got all these entrepreneurial ideas, but maybe you're more of a Hollywood type. Maybe here in the Navy, you, you've, I really wish I could just write a screenplay, but I don't, I don't, I'm stuck on page one, right? You're living in La in a one bedroom apartment waiting tables. You're trying to make rent. It's tough, eh, but you know that if you could just get that like dream that everybody dreams of before they write their screenplay, then you could be set. You bump into Rob Reiner, you bumped into Steven Spielberg a coffee shop, and you just happen to have, and Steven says, pitch your idea. This is your one chance. You'll have a chance. But yeah, what do you got kid? And maybe you don't have anything. Uh, maybe like I said, you're waiting for that dream that comes in the night.
Speaker 1:
25:47
Yup. You don't need that. You have a podcast together. Let's steal this idea. We've just given you, we're about to give you two solid screenplays to steal. Andre, you start this off here. So I had this thought. I was sitting with my cat at the emergency 24 hour er vet, my cat's fine. Do not worry. Um, but going through that, it's like one of the most dramatic environments I've ever been in. I've probably been to the emergency vet like five times in my life. Um, there were videos of just a constant stream of crazy people walking in the last time we went to twin huge black labs. She comes in and she's like, they got into the rat poison in the shadow backbone and then it's like panic. It's like it's a code one and everything's happening. The dogs are fine because I guess rat poison really doesn't affect dogs.
Speaker 1:
26:34
Um, everything is fine, but it's just watching like a revolving door of crazy stories and a gun to my head I was like, why is there not a Grey's anatomy but for the 24 hour vet hospitals? Yes. A what there is already is on animal planet, there are vet shows that are like live reality TV dogs come in, they die, whatever. This would be all drama. Crazy medical cases. So dog has, so is this now, is this more like er in tone or is it more like superstore in tone? I think it's definitely not superstore in [inaudible]. No, no, no. It's, it's great anatomy. It's like look, this a little levity and grades and the beds love each other. Like there's crazy romances happening and then at the same time they're dealing with crazy medical case. Cause I do think there's a case to, to, to make a community or was parks and rec style, like the zaniness that goes on.
Speaker 1:
27:27
But here's the thing, there's no, I, I agree. There definitely is an could be a holiday upgrade, but I think pets are so dramatic. They're so tied that people love. Yeah, that's true. And it's like, and what I struggle with when I watch a medical drama is it's like you don't care about the patient typically and often you hate the patient. In this case, you would always love the patient's patients. I default you love, you love the dog. Like I need the stock to live. There's so much opportunity. And I imagine it would be a pretty cost effective production. Uh, cause you have, you're paying fewer extra as are guest stars. You're really just buying a dog or whatever that looks like. I think there's a lot of opportunity there. I think that it would be an amazing show. Tugs immediately at the heartstrings of America.
Speaker 1:
28:09
Yes. And you can literally rip off Grey's anatomy plot lines, but put them in event hospital. I don't hate it. Created a great show. I like it. I think, uh, I think there's something, I think you guys sense that you don't really watch medical drama. I don't and that's why I feel like you don't really get the concept, but I see the, I see like the, the points you're making that people are attached to most. I've watched some else you should try and commit to one of those shows because they are good. Grey's anatomy is not good, but how is great sure. I've heard could make house and evil just like kind of an evil genius type, uh, primary vet and then it's team of almost like a uh, uh, what's it called? Like a very naturalistic, like, uh, they kind of has a Futu which would also be great is like the Cesar Milan, like, oh my gosh, the main vet.
Speaker 1:
28:59
He has such a connection with animals. It transcends all reality and all like you're living every episode to see the crazy moment where he like touches the dog and he just knows what's wrong. Like this isn't fleece. This has god, this isn't fair. This is, um, I'm on board. I wouldn't watch it, but I would, I would fund it for sure. I will watch it. I will. Okay. I will watch you. We are collecting royalty checks on this idea and then you'll be watching. All right, well I've got a screenplay for you here. Okay. This is not an original idea, but I think, I think the point of the podcast, hold on, hold on. All ideas. This is not a new idea of a show. This is a, a reboot of a franchise that I think the society is perfectly geared towards right now. The, it blows my mind.
Speaker 1:
29:47
I, this hasn't become a thing yet. So this is a live action of, of a beloved cartoon fro from when we were younger. I believe there should be a live action Jetsons nick Offerman like, like it is, it is all the, all the things that we worry about the future like the, the, the Elon Musk, the got the AI, the conversations we're having right now. Like you could fit all that political dialogue into a futuristic Jetson show right now of like, like you like you could make fun like, like it's not a serious show. It's a, it's a whatever that's confusing to me though is are you going to deal with that? So I think is Rosie going to kill the family but like I think like the, the episodes we'll talk about like what is it like what are the cons, you know like we'll show in funny ways the consequences of having everyone had self driving cars.
Speaker 1:
30:37
Right? And like modern family is the consequences of mixed family. Exactly. Like our generational exactly. Like, like modern families like structuralize out until you do a camera pull away effect. But I think you have like Stephen Merchant or like as rosy or you know, or like a really, yeah, very iconic characters that people know, you know George Jetson and, and like right, there's this whole world that like everybody remembers the Jetsons. When you think of the Jetsons, like you have an image and I think you could very easily tap into that and I think people would at least give it a reason. I think the writing would be critical from the studio. I'm going to be the ass studio finance director and that's fine. I think what this does do is it taps into the audience that actually still watches shows like this, which is of a certain age where they watch the Jetsons growing up.
Speaker 1:
31:23
They maybe they watched the Jetsons. I was a young adult. It's on boomerang. Yeah. They are catching it on boomerang cause they stopped cable. Um, so you tap into an audience that will sit down and watch, come on live TV every week. Yeah. Proven audience. Yes. Yeah. You've got the, you've got this place perfectly as a Fox, a Fox cable. See eight o'clock Wednesday night situation, it would play horribly on like a Netflix original. No, no, I don't think he would do well, no way. No Way. But I think you can get a 49 year old who watched the Jetsons to watch this show and probably love it even if the writing isn't that good. I think that's the safe bet. Right. But if the writing happens to be good, then you can get at your audience. Now you're tapping into, say like my younger sister's 18 1920 year old probably maybe could name a Jetson, but then know what the Jetsons are.
Speaker 1:
32:16
They would be familiar with the concept. I don't see, it's like the Flintstones, like I don't think the Flintstones translates as well. And especially when you look at like the movies they've tried to make, I think it's like this weird and like when they tried to like, yeah, we'll have, you know, John Goodman, the Fred Flintstone, they let a great idea, which is a good idea, but nobody wants to watch the Flintstones live action. No, but I think a Jetsons like take technology to the point where we're like doing this cool stuff happening right now. Yeah. And we're interested in like futurism as a big thing and then there's conversations of climate change that you can have in here. Like there's a lot to play with now. There's a lot to do and I think what it taps into is the basis that I think what people would like to see on TV right now is like a positive futurism.
Speaker 1:
33:00
Yeah. Where it's not apocalyptic. It's not like it's not, it's not blade runner steroid. We can maybe visualize a future where technology is advanced. People live a life of a certain quality, but they're still dealing with everyday issues. I think people want to see total nature of the world, a healthy future where it's like we have our own problems now. And like, yeah, W we, we don't devolve into the space. People from a Wally who just are fat and lazy. Like there's still a lot of people who have jobs and they still have to deal with like corporate politics and bull crap. But yeah, it comments on and the way that shows often said in the future do on how we overcame global warming or how we overcame I sin. And it's like, oh, remember six decades ago and yes, all the trees were dying.
Speaker 1:
33:43
Oh, we built, you know, however that might look, right. Space windmills blow the heat away, whatever. I think yes. Which that's another steal. This idea is based when me all set to blow the heat of the soup bowl effect. You understand? So that's a different idea. Um, I do think the show could play well to a certain audience on cable TV, 8:00 PM Wednesday night, just not Netflix, the Jetsons, the jets and not, not Netflix. I would never watch the show on Netflix, but Netflix would also almost certainly find it. Now the hope Andre, is that as this show progresses, people start sending in their ideas. And at this stage we would have a quick meal bag and we'd say, John John Schmo from, you know, from Milwaukee, he's got a great idea. Or He, you know, he's got a screenplay idea and we could have a little banter if we don't have anything right now, cause this is episode one last time, uh, you know, we'll, we'll probably eventually have a, a Twitter handle, maybe an email that's still this idea, you know, at steel city or whatever it ends up being.
Speaker 1:
34:42
Still stay up podcasts, probably something like that. I think that's the show that was fun. I think a, this could continue. This could continue. That's, that is listening to this in the distant future. And you found this on an old USP and then you'll know we gave up. But if, uh, if you're listening to this, because if this is like an A&E Blegh remember the, the rise of steel, this idea, let's take a look back at Andre Washington. Like there's Steve Jobs. This is where it Austin Cook. There's Andre Washington, these great titans of industry. This is where it started. This is where it started. And we're still working on the sign off, but eventually we'll have some clutter thing. Fine. Did it, did
Speaker 3:
35:34
[inaudible]
Speaker 2:
35:38
[inaudible].
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