Steal This Idea

Marq-E

July 13, 2019 Season 1 Episode 3
Steal This Idea
Marq-E
Chapters
Steal This Idea
Marq-E
Jul 13, 2019 Season 1 Episode 3
Andre & Scott
In this episode, Andre and Scott discuss obnoxious neighborhood doorbell ringing. Plus, an edition of Speedround, Good Idea/Bad Idea, and Steal this Joystick.
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, Andre and Scott discuss obnoxious neighborhood doorbell ringing. Plus, an edition of Speedround, Good Idea/Bad Idea, and Steal this Joystick.



Speaker 1:
0:01
You're listening to steal this idea, the Omi podcast. That's a platinum member of spirit. Arable. Yes. Just steal it. Yeah.
Speaker 2:
0:07
Still the same. Yes. Steal this idea. Steal this idea. Stop what you're doing right now. Steal this idea. Steal this idea. Ideas. I'm telling you right now to beat, to steal. Decide. Yes.
Speaker 1:
0:30
Alright. Can I see still the same view? Yes. Steal this idea. Welcome back everyone to steal this idea. Scott here. Andre, I'm here sitting across the table with a j dog. Always a pleasure. We love a hot dog on this podcast. We'd love a hot dog on this podcast. Maybe you can get j dog gets a sponsor one day. Probably not though. Um, if you are just tuning in for the first time, it's still this idea. The quick and dirty is that we, me and Andre, we have genius, genius ideas where basically a think tank and we've been approached several times to start off with, you know, start up a think tank for multimillion dollar corporations. We've chosen instead to give these ideas to the people and to let you guys run with them. Um, so you're completely free to steal any of these ideas. We kind of flush them out, go through lots of fun little things, ideas that have been marketed towards us, you know, breaking down good, bad ideas, stuff like that.
Speaker 1:
1:22
So that's the podcast and let's just get right into it. Andre. Um, we're gonna start with our first segment, which is good idea, bad idea. Uh, Andre, kick us off with, uh, something you've been been pitched to so many things lately. The, I think I want to talk about the most is, and I said to Steve Scott is the first AI diary app, which this is reflectively, this is reflectively, a reflectively. Dot app. Interesting concept. I think that ultimately though I landed in a place of your diary is supposed to be like the most personal thing that you own and what possibly could machine learning, artificial intelligence offer. It's marketed as the world's first intelligent journal to which I say, how's I did? I will. And I like, did I ever need my journal to be intelligent? It's, it's kind of a one way talk track.
Speaker 1:
2:12
Is there something specific that's like, oh, I like, like what's the, is there some hook that they have? I, I can't really, when I look at this, I see, I guess, I mean, I guess you can like track your location and tracking whether it looks like you may be feed it a couple of data points, like, um, how you're feeling each day on in a numeric scale. And then maybe it draws out some sort of score. Mercury is in retrograde kind of thing going on. Uh, reflectively, Huh? Yes. It's not a good idea. It's kind of where I'm headed with this. And you've got, this was like, this was on my Instagram heavily for a couple of days. I think that they had like $200 a day just targeted Utah 18 to 25 hard. You know what's interesting is that is there, I actually do have a desire for a journaling app.
Speaker 1:
3:02
Um, and, and I've looked for this because I'm not somebody who writes journalist very well. I would love, um, kind of in the, the Martian where he's like, just talking to a camera. I would love some very simple thing that just like it like prompts up say, hey, tell me what's on your mind. And I could just record myself without having to do a whole lot of leg work. And like it doesn't just store into my photos thing, it's just like stores in the cloud or whatever. Like I would love something that was like very intuitive that I could just speak into and talk like talk through my feelings as a journal and then kind of go through that. But I, I think that would be great. Like picture a, you seem like the Facebook portal. Yeah. Or like the Amazon show. Yes. Something where it actually recorded my face cause I, I had a new year's resolution this year, which I did not stick to, which was that I wanted to record like a short video every day talking about something, just like kind of have that memory piece.
Speaker 1:
3:54
Didn't stick to it at all. But if like, if Alexa was like, hey, um, what was the funniest thing that happened today? And it was kind of a random prompt each day. And then, yeah. Oh so that I could go back and watch it the whole year. A 15 second like quick funny. Totally stories. That would be a really good app. Yeah. It was just like if you had some really good story you could just like tap one button and just like get automated. You don't have to let go and now sort it and log in. Log into factor. Yeah. This is like write down what happened and then record yourself because that's the closest thing I could find was not called a journey, which was like more like a regular dollar gap but just happened to also take video like that's not what I want. I want video.
Speaker 1:
4:34
First sign. Yeah, but my, my journal for the, yeah, hundred percent so that's a reflectively I think you, you're not let us into a way better idea than what you currently have. A the what I've been seeing often, and maybe you've seen this is butcher box. Have you seen butcher backs? I'm going to guess, haven't have never heard of that. Sure. I'm going to guess. It's a monthly subscription box that sends you a cut of meat. That is exactly what it is. I am a genius. Um, it is a, uh, it seems like it's a host of meats. It's pork, it's chicken, it's steak, it's bacon, it's pampers. Right. I don't in theory hate the idea of this me either really because, because as I've, as I've grown and matured, I find myself more and more going to the, you know, the actual butcher Deli and grocery store and asking for that, you know?
Speaker 1:
5:23
Right. That, I mean that's approach it right there. Like never buy bacon just from a, like on the shelves, go to the butcher, it's like 50 cents more and it's like nice, thick premium pepper. It, it's much better. Um, quick interjection. Who at what age do you feel comfortable going to the butcher counter? That's, I'm 25 years old and it's a lie. When I can't, I have to send somebody up. I get nervous. I don't know what questions I going to ask. They can cause sometimes they look at you like, yes. Like you've, you've ruined something they're doing cause they're cutting stuff. You're like, I'm sorry, I didn't mean to. Um, yeah, they are nicer than they put off. I would say. I think once I had, cause really what it came down to is, um, as I started having kids, I started making breakfast a lot more, make a lot more eggs, a lot more bacon, a lot more stuff.
Speaker 1:
6:09
And yeah, I was unsatisfied with the amount of bacon, the quality of the bacon, those cooking. So I want to get some milk better. So that's what kind of pushed nudge me into communication. So once you have your first kid or you know, once you are in that stage of life where you're like, you know, you consider yourself an adult, maybe 30, like late, late twenties maybe. Anyway, um, I don't hate the idea of this. The only problem is it's kind of a, the problem is a lot of these subscription boxes, it's just like, I don't, I don't know if I eat enough meat consistently that I, like if I get, if ever there comes a time where all of a sudden I'm like, oh shoot, I forgot to cancel this. I forgot the positives. I've got too much meat now. I envisioned myself 100% having a freezer full of meat and depending like this was stupid like I to meet that.
Speaker 1:
6:56
I kind of agree. I kind of don't because um, we used to do blue, blue, blue, a friend at my house and we never cooked them young, but we obviously would freeze the meat. Um, super expensive delivered to your house by the way. Um, and we ended up with a freezer with probably like seven or eight random cuts of meat, but we cooked through him. Yeah. You know, I just took the time there. Worst things and having a freezer full. It's true. It's not the worst thing. I just like when you can get a bag of 30 chicken breasts at Costco for like 18 bucks. Yeah. And that can just stay in your freezer. It's like, why do I need that as well as a premium cut of chicken that now that I'm going to freeze anyway, so I'm not going to say bad today.
Speaker 1:
7:39
I think it's a good idea. I think, I think they could find the right, maybe they're already doing it, but I think butcher box and find that right angle where the, you know, cause they do stuff where they're like, hey, free bacon for the whole year. If you sign up like, oh, let's like, that's like a park. That's a perkier like free burgers all summer long. It's like, oh, there's like clever ways to do this. Ah, their website makes me feel some type of way. Like their website burgers and it looks so freaking good. I can't even think straight. Yeah. Uh, do you have any more or you want to move on? Um, I have another or we could move on. Let's do one more quick one and then we'll move on to the next. I really want to talk about this serial cotton magic spoon. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
8:17
You're getting ads for this am and every ad I get is this stupid cereal and I don't know how to feel about it because on the one hand, I think it looks like cereal for aliens. Like it looks like Cheerios from another dimension, another dimension. And it's like, they're like cinnamon toast crunch, but they look just like these perfect little owes. It's very weird. And it's called magic spoon, which I don't like. Um, but apparently it's healthy and it's like if you're doing kito apparently this is like the cereal for you. Totally. Eh, Eh, I've, I, there was a time where I was like, you know, I used to eat cereal all the time. I'm now, you know, in the dad bod stage, I have to watch what I eat. I just do a, I used to love cereal, but it's like really hard to justify once you kind of realize that cereal is basically a dessert.
Speaker 1:
9:03
Yeah. You know, it changes everything. It really does. And so, and so I saw this, it's like, yeah, it's like one net carb for a bowl of cereal or it's like, Whoa, that's pretty great. You know, especially when you can, you know, it's two grams of sugar, one net carbs. Like, man, that's killer. Yeah. The only problem, and this is, I mean, I don't know if you've looked at the pricing model, looking at the pricing right now. It is agregious. It's $10 a box, which is crazy. Which is crazy. Here's the thing. I don't, I maybe it's expensive to make it and I just don't know. I can't believe that it is. I think they are. They're mark. I think they are capitalizing on like it's gluten free. Therefore we charge more. Yeah. If someone came out with a multiple meal bag size of this stuff and I could just get it, I would buy some that we're talking like the Walmart version of the, the value brand of this.
Speaker 1:
9:50
I'm all in on it. They say it's just a dollar 39 of bowl. Yeah. I have to think of that. That's a small bowl. Yeah. That's a cup. That's a, which is not really what people eat does look like. It's made out of Styrofoam, like it does not look like something humans should consume. There's, there's another one too. There's Madec spoon. There's another one that is similar. I can't remember it's called, but there's a competitor out there that it's a similar model. It's expensive. If you, honestly, if you cut the price in half, I think a $5 box of cereal isn't out of the question, but a $10 box of cereal, no way. That's, that's a full meal. That's not rationale. The reason you buy cereal like in college or whatever, he's like, oh I can get, I can get a $3 thing of honeycomb that'll last me for six weeks.
Speaker 1:
10:37
Well and I almost look at it as a product where they're marking it as healthy cereal. I think it's probably closer to, um, to have more of a weight loss kind of cereal because there's no, there's nothing in it. It's not necessarily that it's a goal of mine, it's just not, not full of sugar. I often, I often talk to my wife cause she's a lot more healthy than I am and I, and I say, you know, I wish there was more of a scale of like healthy for you, neutral for you and then bad for you. Exactly. There's lots of things like this is like, yeah, this is neutral for you. Which is like, oh, it's not bad for you. That's a, that's a right direction, but it's not healthy for her. It's not healthy. I had this exact conversation about j dogs the other day, which is like, is Jay dogs healthy for you?
Speaker 1:
11:18
No, it's hot died but it seems better to me than like McDonald's. Right. It's a hot dog. Right, right. It seems more towards the neutral. Yeah, exactly. Slide. Um, awesome. Well I think that's, that's good. Uh, what we're going to do, listeners, we still haven't come up with a name with our idea of clan ideologues wasn't that or ice, which maybe it's sticking cause I remembered it. I was thinking idea boys, but that's, that's not right. I don't want to add is so wrong. Uh, so, uh, on our website go still this idea.com, um, you, you all are going to be there, but also we'll a slide of all the products that we review, whether we kick on Nico, we kick them or we praise them, they're all going to be there. If it's something that like maybe you're interested, if you want to see magic spoon, but still this idea.com it's going to be there.
Speaker 1:
12:06
We'll direct everyone to do this, these fabulous, uh, advertisements that we've been getting all right now to the main event. It's still this idea I've been, I've been stewing about this one, Andrea. I'm nervous about it. I'm nervous for you because I think there's something here. I really do. Okay. Okay. And there's some, this is like, I know that you can't fully relate yet cause you're not living in a suburban area with kids. So yet, yet, okay, here's the scenario. Uh, you've got some kids and you've got kids that are hanging out. You go to the neighborhood, you see these kids, they're all going to each other's houses. All of them. You, that was you what it was back in the day, you would just, you know, knocking, knocking on doors, knocking on, Hey, I'm calling so-and-so. There's Jimmy there. I wanna go play with them.
Speaker 1:
12:52
Yeah. Now there's a couple of problems, especially here in Utah where there's lots of kids. Problem. Number one. Let's say I got an infant in the house. Sleeping little. I've got my door laundry, not slamming on the door, slamming the door bell. That's a problem. All right. All right, so, so, and here's the other problem is maybe there are windows of the day where it's like, I don't want my kid hanging out with anyone right now. It's family time or it's we're doing homework, whatever it is. So this is the idea and this, that's that. This is phase one. I got it. The product's called Marquis be being capitalized on new land. The second, the second I started started, I knew that this is where I was headed. Okay, so marquis is about the size of a kindle fire and it's closer to a boogie board goes right, right in the middle of your door.
Speaker 1:
13:42
Yeah. Now, now I, I, I'm, I'm leading you into the, this is the kid scenario here, but this more applications than just kids. So this serves as basically a electronic doormat of sorts where you can send a very clear signal to anybody coming to your door what you want them to see. Right now. So for kids it's obvious. I mean you can have a very red, yellow, green type of scenario. If it's green, come on in. If it's yellow knock, if it's red, don't knock right. Very easy to teach that to kids that could see that. It makes sense on top of that. Um, yeah, you could send messages and I think, I think all it's, it's Bluetooth enabled. It's all by your phone. It's all one touch. So I opened up the app on my phone. I have 10 preloaded messages that say come on in, let's say, you know, not here right now, whatever it is.
Speaker 1:
14:25
And they last for a duration that you set last for an hour. And then after that just kind of reverts back to some with the Canadians are where the whatever's right. Right. So, so there's this kid factor, but also just general people, right? Like if I'm out back, we're having a barbecue come on in I that I don't want to like write this on a piece of paper. I just push a button, take your shoes off please. Right. Like there's lots of applications you're saying if you are, if you're Amazon, right, put the package behind behind the package behind the planter. Yeah. You know, or whatever. Right? So you, or you could have a five minute thing is this is the door code. You know someone's there, right? The price point here is I'm thinking $49 just under 50 bucks. It's less expensive than a ring doorbell, which yes, you have the to a the, it's great that's has its own utility, but this could, I think go in tandem with that or replace that, you know, be kind of a cheaper cost in there.
Speaker 1:
15:19
And again, the technology, the screen wouldn't have to be amazing. You could get the cheapest, it just has to display a message. Yeah. I mean a step for her watching that foot, that's a step up from a boogie board and a step down. Maybe like a photo book is the photos, right? Marquis, what do you think? I am obsessed. And so Scott earlier in the week, he's like, I have a a big idea, but I think it's going to be the first one that it's kind of a died. I actually think this is the best one yet. And here's the, here's the evidence though. This, this isn't just like me talking where I think the you says is you're way off base with the pitch. That's like the neighborhood kids wander around and they're like, it's great. I can go in. That's like the dumbest cs.
Speaker 1:
16:00
But what is so much more powerful is like the ability, I have the start last night I ordered crumble cookies to my house, crumble. What should be a sponsor, this bike gas. Cause I've now mentioned that twice, 100%. Um, I, and I was to myself how awesome it would be. I didn't want to text the driver and be like, you can just leave them on the doorstep. Just felt weird to do that. But I was thinking like, I don't want to get out of bed right now, but I do still have those cookies. I wished that I could just have a note beyond the door right now that says leave on doorstep. It has a $5 bill. It says keep the change of filthy animal with the guy from home alone. It would be awesome. And I think, but then when it's not being used for a message, it says my house number, which is really hard to find on my house and it's illuminated from the street for deliveries and people finding me house.
Speaker 1:
16:45
I'm the other use is if you've used Uber or maybe even Lyft in the last six months. There's a recent feature on Uber where you can hold up your phone and it's like a color and the driver is looking for the color to find you. Oh, interesting. And I'm thinking like you, you're having a party at your house, you're like, go to the house with the green light on, right. And it's like, okay, I know that I'm at the right place. Messages like, come on in, we're upstairs or come to the backyard. It's a party. Come in. And then that's like for an hour. And then it just reverts right back to your address. Even just, you know, there's scenarios like say your say you're gone, but you know that somebody may start like just putting your, hey text me if you don't, if you need to get ahold of Scott, text him, here's my number.
Speaker 1:
17:31
Yeah, something like that. Like super valuable, you know? And sometimes like we will doing something in like my parents are like a in La will come over, but we don't really know if it's an in law. But like over the reason they're coming over is important. Like I'll stop what I'm doing. But if they're just like in the neighborhood or like whatever, you know. So, so there's, yeah, being able to like communicate a message to somebody at your front door. Makes Sense. Baby Asleep. Don't ring doorbell. Yes, it's, I think there's a use, I think that at the right price point it's kind of like, it's not even 50 in my mind, but it's just a cheap iPad essentially. It's like the cheapest possible tablets. I mean fire tablets sell for like for like 70 bucks, if that sounds about right. So you have to imagine if a fire tablets that much, then there's a brand below even a fire tablet, totally that you white label and you put like your software on, it connects to an app.
Speaker 1:
18:23
You get, so pushing messages and you're setting your default message. Yeah. And I really love the idea of like open up the app and seriously like if they're like big blocks that like in two seconds I tap it and I don't think about it showing this. Yeah. Like, well at some point I might customize. I want this to be for two hours and I want this to be for five minutes or whatever. Maybe I want to draw something or maybe you don't put a funny meme or whatever. I mean there's some fun flavor there. I just feel like Jimmy's birthday party. Yeah, the sign is Fuchsia and then I'm that invite, you're like, this is our address. Look for the sign. Right. And it's like, can't miss it. Totally. Super easy. Not a bad idea. Pitfalls. I think batteries is the tough one. Is it?
Speaker 1:
19:09
Ah, I mean so, so it's like these we have, um, I'm doing the thing where I said I shouldn't use my ads and then I immediately saw my hands. So we have at the office like basically iPads mounted two conference rooms to indicate availability. They're hard wired. I mean I'm sure that a similar setup could be accomplished. Yeah, I'm not, that's harder. Yeah. I'm not 100% sure. I mean it might be, cause I know they have some security cameras, some anchor security cameras that basically lasts for like a week at a time. And then you basically have to charge them for like an hour or something. And so like if you could find the right cause that's the thing, again, this is limited. It's a Bluetooth, it's a screen. You don't need any storage really. You know, you don't need any advanced anything, you know? And I'm just thinking like in my entryway I have an outlet.
Speaker 1:
19:58
Yeah. And like if I could suction cup or whatever the Meccan adhesive an iPad to the window. Sure. Then I could plug it in. Yeah. He's got a couple idea there. Yeah. I just feel like this product, which is pretty low value, like it's just sure it's not life changing. It would be really easy to be like the first time it dies you're like, oh well that plan falls over in wind storms. Like, well I'll just get one. Yeah, exactly. And you don't want that. I don't think. And I think it's a good, uh, it's a good, not stocking stuffer, but it's like a, you could give this to grandma, you could give this to like anyone who's fighting Guinea homeowner, you know, it's like an easy like, oh, we'll come to home. Like these things are great, you know? Totally. There's a feeling really good about the point there.
Speaker 1:
20:41
I really, really don't hate that. My wife's going to feel really good about this because this was like kind of her idea really. And I was so, I was like trying to flush it out with her. I'm like, I, I'm worried Andrew's going to find some say it's not practical enough, but I think it's practical swung. Yeah. I think that again, the box definitely isn't the neighborhood kid availability alert system. That's like the dumbest value value prop before it. But that's an easy way to market it. Yeah, it's like towards as a use case. Sure. I think the easiest way to market it is actually as like an electric address sign that really is a ideologues. You smell your deck, you list out what you think the best mark go to market strategy for. I'll love the name Marquis, but oh that's the other thing I was going to say.
Speaker 1:
21:28
It's Alexa enabled and you could say I'm washing my hands. Alexa, tell Marcie I'm busy and all of a sudden scribbles that out. Someone knocks or whatever. I get it. I'll be there in five minutes or I'm in the bathroom or whatever. Like I go, Alexa enabled. That's my, that's there is a real product here. Somebody make it, please see you. Like steal it. I'm all right. Let's move into some speed round honor. I think you have some, um, from some leftovers from last time and maybe some new ones here. Oh, okay. Um, I have a couple of items for speeding around a couple of leftovers and really these are maybe closer to things I just want to get Scott's thoughts on and our audiences thoughts on are these good ideas or bad ideas? I think love it. Um, and they're not products. So the first one is listening to podcasts and books at 1.5 or two x speed.
Speaker 1:
22:19
Um, I've seen this a lot, which is like, uh, I Jacob who I occasionally carpet with will listen to a podcast at 1.5 x speed for the whole time we did it like on a trip to Vegas. And what are your thoughts? I have, I have a feeling what your thoughts are. Um, I would say there is, I could see there being a small sliver of like, yeah, if you're listening to something that is a bit of a grind, like the scriptures, like the Bible, you know, it's so sacrilegious, they'd be like, I'm putting this on two x speed and I'm going to just let it, or like something that's like strictly informative. But like to me part of the podcast is the nuance in the conversation is the banter is the cadence of voice that, that the hosts have. And like you lose that a little bit when you, uh, when you speed it up.
Speaker 1:
23:10
So yeah, I'm going to say, I'm going to say I had a fan, not a fan now me either. And I think that the issue that I have with it is it's just obviously yet like is not good for the medium of audio. Yeah. But also I just feel like it's a sign of the apocalypse that like we're consuming information at such a rate that we can't even listen to human speech at a normal pace. Like we cam here record you and then just speed it up. So I can get through what you're saying faster. Yes, exactly. So I can move on to the next thing. Like we're just so hungry for information that even the brain is now too slow for us. It scares me. That's funny. That's a good point. Yeah. This is common. I looked this up, there were a lot of articles talking about this.
Speaker 1:
23:55
Um, a lot of people think it's evil. Yeah. I don't, I don't, I don't know about evil. I, he, oh, I get, I get being like gallons. Like it's the healthiest thing you can do. I think it, I think it detracts from the experience. Yeah. So it's not evil, but it's, I dunno as we just say, like maybe think, think about like what's going on in my brain that makes me need to listen to this at two x. Think about the implications of have that desire. Maybe you don't train your kids on, right. I got one for you here. What about the Nintendo switch light? I told Scott yesterday that I was going to buy this and well, they really, a group of people laughed in my face. All right. So here's the situation. I have a switch now. Yup. A regular old switch me to actually have another switch.
Speaker 1:
24:43
This will be my third switch. But I like the color and I like it. To be fair, the reason you have to is because you are going to, I have a whole situation. Yeah. But um, I think, I dunno, I like the idea of one that would just live in my backpack that I would always have sure that would never come out. And that's one cohesive unit and not like the slidey in sand. It's a little bit smaller and it's in the fun yellow color. Here's the reality. I play my switch in in portable mode 90% of the time. I almost never played on full screen. I was, some people they, it's like they dock it and that's what they did. So I think that's where we're different. So like this is to me when I pitch people on, yeah. Again, I'm a, I'm a married guy with kids.
Speaker 1:
25:28
I say what's great about the switch is that instead of getting yelled at by my wife, play Xbox downstairs in the gaming area, I can bring my switch into bed next to her and she can read a book and I can please switch. And when she hasn't, it's all in what she wants to talk. I can pause it and we can talk and it's like she's a lot more okay with that. I'm sure she's listening to this and been like, no I'm not. I hate all of it. But like I, I know she would prefer that over me being that Oh, out of the room, you know with her. So like I think this is, like I said, I think this is pretty cool. The fact that it plays all the same games. Like I'm, I'm, I think it's a good idea. Yeah. I think, I mean, so it's being argued that it's basically the end of the three Ds, which I think that's all their hand handheld counsels, which is great.
Speaker 1:
26:08
So if you're going to do that, then end it right and then make this console available and then I'm going to buy it in place of my next three Ds, which we'll probably do four. I will say that the stigma, when I see somebody three ds in the airport, I'm like, hmm, it's just nerd alert. It's like, it's what I see some of these folks. I'm like, and that's, you know, props in marketing. He like, they've made it kind of cool and fun and like it's not weird to have a switch. And so like I think it's a smart, smart, strategic mind to know I'll buy one. I definitely will buy one. Yeah. One more. Yeah. Uh, this is old news at this point, but I still want to talk about it and maybe it's a greater commentary on streaming platforms, but big news, maybe two weeks ago, the NBC or ABC taking the office to their own streaming platform and off of Netflix, which caused like tears and crying and cause it's like their number one thing.
Speaker 1:
26:55
It's a, I mean it's nbcs number one thing and it's also Netflix is number y thing, right? Crazy. It's a really tough situation and I think that, I don't really know how to feel about it. It's like NBC obviously wants to get a start in their own stream platform, but what I'm curious about is when that happens, do you say screw NBC, I'm never going to subscribe to NBC online or do you say screw Netflix? There's nothing good on this platform anymore? Like who wins in that situation? So here's my problem, what Netflix has done. So they'd been doing this a while now and the value of Netflix, Netflix to me is this like robust variety that they've been cultivating over like years. Right? So it's like as every year that goes on, the stickiness to me of Netflix is that much better because now there's like kids shows and baby shows and there's is planet earth and there's like all this stuff that like when I'm browsing to Netflix, I'm like, what am I in the mood for?
Speaker 1:
27:51
I don't know. And Netflix helps me zero in on that. Whereas like NBC, they might have some great shows, but like there's a reason, I mean there's a reason I canceled cable and it's, to me it's the reason why Netflix is, is a stronger platform than Hulu, which is that like Hulu is very much focused on like just TV shows like has other stuff, but it's like TV shows. Whereas Netflix is like, we are like an entertainment to the point where they're doing Bandersnatch like interacted stuff and they were like experimenting in this space here. So like I have a hard time seeing anything other than a megalith like Disney plus who can come in and be like, you're going to hire our library is somehow bigger than yourself. Like they were about the only company in the world who I think would actually provide a value add of like, okay, that's worth getting.
Speaker 1:
28:36
But like I don't think any other Comcast, NBC, Fox, any of these guys could come in and say like, well, but well we have family guy and we have friends. It's like, yeah, those are nice. But like that's not why people get, not like the office is not why people get Netflix. It's clearly popular on Netflix cause something you can turn on. But that's the nature of the show is that like it's a popcorn show you can just turn on. Well and like one of the best arguments that I've heard thus far is, okay, I love the office. I'm just going to buy the seasons on iTunes. My head. Right. And I'm going to still have that content, but I'm not going to subscribe to NBC universal just so I can have the office on while I wash dishes. Yeah. I'm an I just by the office and I'm gonna have it in higher quality and I'm not holding it and not have to pay anybody.
Speaker 1:
29:21
And then I'll keep my Netflix subscription. Yeah, I think it's, I think it's done move. I think it's, yeah. All right. We're going to do a new segment here and then we're going to do moving to mailbag and we'll be done. So this is a, a deviant of steel. This idea or [inaudible] various of variants. Variant is the various steal this idea. I call it steal this joy stick. Now the premise of this is, is both Andre and I, we like to game, I'm work gamers. And if only we had at our disposal, you know, a full suite of Activision or ea to just pick our brains and to create the next, you know, huge MMO or the next huge, you know, million dollar, billion dollar game. Fortunately we have this podcast. So if anybody working at those companies are listening, you're about to get at least one, maybe two really good ideas.
Speaker 1:
30:16
This is big for you. Yeah, you should be excited. So I'll start us off here on drain. Um, let me, let me tell you this, the scenario in which I think, uh, often I find myself, so I enjoy gaming and I think my friends also enjoy gaming. But there, the problem with most games these days is there's a very large skill gap, right? If I, if, if you played league of legends or destiny or some of these games, I don't play for you to say, Hey, come play league of legends with us. It's like, is never gonna happen. Literally the least fun thing in the world. It sucks for me. And for you. Yeah. There are some games that are like much more forgiving. I think battle Royale Games have liked shown this like game like four. And I was like, yeah, anybody can play. And like if you like have like the general idea of shooters, like you can like I've made it to the end of Fort night and I'm like not the best at shooters.
Speaker 1:
31:03
Right? Yeah. So, um, so this concept of like a game that anybody could play and I really liked the idea of like a 10 minutes game. So it's like we're hanging out when there's a group of us, I was like, Hey, do you want to play quick, quick round of this? And everybody, there's not the skill gap. Everybody could just hop in and play quicker. I'm Kinda like Mario Cart, it's like that. It's like it's a very approachable, anybody comes like hop it and like do, okay. The game is called bus. Okay. Say you're ripping off fort night to start, continue. Uh, yes. But only in that sense. Battle buses, a game that is kind of like twisted metal. Okay. Um, there's this game called lovers and dangerous spacetime. Yes, we've played it. So what's great about that game is it's like your, this, it's this 2d ship and like everybody like hops on a gunner and like you go through this kind of space invaders as type mission and it's very fun.
Speaker 1:
32:02
Everybody has played with loves it. It's like you pick it up instantly. I want that exact game in a three dimensional deathmatch but everyone is in a bus and the bus has guns and turrets and missiles and it's, it's, it's uh, it's a four player match. Everybody starts at four corners of an arena and you say, Hey, I need three guys. Like you can choose a two, three, four, five, six, seven or eight bus size and you matched up in size. And so if it's just me and you, hey, let's do it, uh, you know, a doubles bus, you drive, I shoot, you know, or I'll be the driver and all of you guys are my gunners. Right? And then it's just like as simple as like you just have to shoot the other piece. It's like very soft. There's no mechanic, there's no, somebody can play a support role so that we could play an engineering role, a destructive role.
Speaker 1:
32:48
Right. And it's like very short matches. I think a game like this, it's like got the same essence of rocket league quick and snappy and like high energy I think would kill it. Right. And in this world it's a d environment or a three. It's a three d. Okay. Yeah, I think I like it. And the idea of like you're unlocking, so it's, it's buses but then there's school buses and there's semi trucks and trains and like it's very over the top aesthetics, you know, and you're unlocking all these different, you know, I like it. I think it's a good idea. I think, um, we really liked that kind of like collaborative gaming element where it's like, like levers in a dangerous spacetime. Yeah. All in one unit. Yes. Which is really great. And then different roles is really great. And then I'm mechanic, that's just shoot the other people.
Speaker 1:
33:34
Shoot isn't really easy and maybe there's like there's layers of complexity where it's like somebody could play a more strategic role that's necessary to get an advantage or there's ways, there's elements of the game mean there's, and that's how it should be. There should be people that are good at the game even though it's really entry level on anybody can come in and do well. You also want people that optimize for strategy, right? And they're like building buses look have strong team elements and there's, there's some element of like you choose where the guns are, you choose exactly. Kind of like the layout and that's the strategy that's, it's like you could just go with the generic something, but actually baby she put more on the rear and more on the top of whatever. Like that's fun. That's fun to do with friends. Right? And just to be like, oh, what if we tried this, this and this and the Games for 10 minutes.
Speaker 1:
34:16
We try rockets instead of lasers. And if you try these guns instead of these, maybe that'll give us a better edge or whatever. And the driver, what have you, what have you stand me outside the whole time? Yeah. Or what if we go straight to the wait for these guys. [inaudible] avoiding people and tell them that like there's a ton of different ways to play that kind of game. That's awesome. Yeah. I think I would play battle bus. I think I would play, I think couch collapse situation together. It'll be fine. Perfect. Do you have one or do you want to just go to mail bag? Well let's go to my, that mailbag. Wrap this up. Okay. We got two entries in my bag. The first one is from a, uh, a lovely lady named Janice under. What do you think about this idea? I am ready.
Speaker 1:
35:01
Janice writes in and she says there should be a whiteboard that saves everything you write on it and then emails that to everyone you want. I think I like the idea. Um, did you ever have like a smartboard? I, I've seen like, I don't know where like does that, but it seems like a good idea. We often in the business context or like taking pictures of whiteboards and then I don't think those pictures ever actually done anything like that. I think it's just like kind of a safety. It's like oh just in case. Yeah. Um, I didn't think that it would be great if you could like hit a button and then the whiteboard content emailed. Of course it's like the technology are we there? I don't know how it would work to me. I've thought about this because I worked at a company called lucid chart and like they, they do the online diagrams and I was like, oh there's a way you could like dyke cause you're very keen to diagram something on the board.
Speaker 1:
35:51
How could you translate it? So I was thinking if you, to me the, the, the thing that makes the most sense is some sort of like four pink sensors that you put on the corner of your whiteboard. Then some sort of like ring that goes around your marker and like some kind of have that for paper. Yeah. There's like a live scribe pen. Yeah. You're writing on paper. But it's knowing like how you're moving the pants to then translate the actual results. So you have this four axes and then checks the pen and then like at the end of it, it's a psych. You get some notifications, like who do you want this to be emailed to and you'd say that intense. I like that because it would be great to be able to diagram totally with your hand, which is how you, the human mind wants to do it, but then have it digitally.
Speaker 1:
36:31
Definitely some engineering work. I don't even know where to start there. You'd have, I mean I'm sure lots of people thought of this, but I think it's a good idea. I think you start with look up live scribe and then just make that, but for whiteboard it's really similar content because I know there's, yeah, there's these like surfboards or tango boards or whatever. They're like, they're huge thousand dollars things. It's like, oh no, I think this is like a couple of hundred bucks that you just plug and play into your existing environment. I think that's a better way to do it. Totally. All right. What's the, what's the mailbag you have for us on, right. I'm kind of skeptical on this line, but Scott maybe isn't so much. Um, this was pitched to me. Your a who says mail nail salons, places like sport clips that offer man, uh, curious [inaudible] uh, I just don't want a manicure or pedicure, so I think that's why this doesn't connect with me.
Speaker 1:
37:16
Sure. But people love sports clips so I can kind of see how it's like what if we took sports clips and offered it to different grooming scenarios. Totally. I kind of get it. Here's the thing. Manicures, I'm with you. That's weird. Sure. Eddie. Curious. Literally one of my favorite things in the world, again, I really love getting pedicures and why? Just basically a foot massage is what it is. It's like a 30 minute foot massage and it's like you're, you're laying down, you're relaxing, they massage your feet. Yeah. They like clip your toenails or whatever. Like they're not putting nail Polish on or whatever, like yeah. But they're like putting all this wax on and this like they're becoming clean. Yeah. It's a very relaxing experience, but there's two problems. One, it's also nail salon, so there's a little bit of a smell there. It's kind of jarring and too, it's very much catered towards women.
Speaker 1:
38:02
Like you go into stigma around a man can go get a pap solutely, but we can see how some Americans might feel uncomfortable in that environment. Sure. And especially the more kind of macho man you are. I think there's like a, yeah, I'll admit I would never go to the, you know, even though I would tell that guy to get off. Right. He does need to go get over it cause pedicures are amazing. But I see how we started to see a business of law. If there is an aesthetic that's like rustic woods and it's not just pedicures, it's also, it's also a barber's. Yeah. And maybe you can get a nightcap there, you know, like, yeah, you're speaking my language now. Now it's like, hey, instead of doing this meeting on the golf course or in this business room, let's all circle the wagons at this.
Speaker 1:
38:48
At the manicure, at the, at the, at the, at the IC it kind of being like, I'm just shop. That's what you call it. You call it the shop. You go to the shop and like Gen eds barbershop. It's like, yeah, trying to eat barbershops. Totally. I could see this being a like station or whatever. Add a chads. Yeah, I know. I, I think you have a whole, it's, it's a, uh, it's a, what's it called when you, it's a pampering, pampering for men and it's very much the, the sports clips vein. I think he could work. No, I'm not against that. I could see myself doing such a thing. I really could. Okay. Well those are two good ideas. Um, go steal this idea.com is the website goes through this idea at Jima luck or no idea at goes to this idea. Dot Com is our email.
Speaker 1:
39:36
Uh, and I think it's a ghost still aside or earth made it steal. This idea of one is our Twitter handle. I know nothing about it. We could just search, go steal this idea. You'll find us. Um, that's the episode, Andre. That's all we've done. It triggered a lot of ground. We did. That was a big, that was a big episode. Lots of ideas. 10, 10 extra minutes for our listeners. Uh, yeah, I a Andre is going to be, uh, given the idea next week. The, the main, the main course. I think I've got a good run. He's got a good one. So tune in next week. Um, eventually was driving guests, but uh, yeah, let's know what you think. Listen to your ideas and we will get you guys out here.
Speaker 3:
40:16
[inaudible]
Speaker 2:
40:21
[inaudible]
Speaker 3:
40:26
[inaudible].
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