Steal This Idea

Nexserve?

July 22, 2019 Season 1 Episode 4
Steal This Idea
Nexserve?
Chapters
Steal This Idea
Nexserve?
Jul 22, 2019 Season 1 Episode 4
Andre & Scott
In this episode, Andre and Scott discuss how much laundry sucks. Plus, an edition of Good Idea/Bad Idea, Speedround, and an introduction to billionaire investor and philanthropist Romeo Butters.
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, Andre and Scott discuss how much laundry sucks. Plus, an edition of Good Idea/Bad Idea, Speedround, and an introduction to billionaire investor and philanthropist Romeo Butters.  



Speaker 1:
0:00
You're listening to steal this idea, the only podcast that wears white after Labor Day. I guess just steal it.
Speaker 2:
0:07
It's still the same. Yes. It's still this idea. Still this idea still what you're doing right now. Steal this idea. Steal this idea. Tell you right now to beat, to steal this idea.
Speaker 1:
0:33
Yes. Steal this idea. Hello again. Thieves, Scott here. And this is what I've landed on is Steve's theaters eye not the way better than ideal on 100 million times. So hopefully maybe we get some shirts that say like, I'm a thief. You know, ideally thieves. Maybe we'll have like a, a book club, 40 thieves, seams, nation, these nation. See, it's going to catch on. Mark my words. Yes. Uh, welcome back. Everyone. Uh, Scott can engineer Andre A. It's still this idea or we got a good show for you guys today. Uh, yeah, I'm gonna do a new segment. Andre supposedly has a killer idea. He's definitely not nervous about it. Not at all, at all. Um, and again, for those, if this happens to be your first time listening in, me and Andre are geniuses with million dollar ideas. And we're giving them to you, the people to steal them, run with him.
Speaker 1:
1:22
You have full rights to just take these and make them, cause we don't have the time for free, for free please far the minor reality check that you ought to play, that your conscience should just canker away at you. Um, so I think we just get right into it. Uh, the first, first segment here is going to be good idea. Bad idea. Uh, Andre, what have you been pitched lately on Instagram? So last time or one of these times, Scott and I had a conversation about how I think he's just like a little bit more in dad mode than I am a hundred percent. Scott loves to grill. I needed help with a smoker last weekend and Scott was on hand help out. Um, you've got a dad here. Yes, but I'm not a dad, which means that this is bad Instagram targeting, but I got an ad for a knife sharpening by male.
Speaker 1:
2:11
Oh. And it's like a trendy site. Like you would think that, I dunno who would come up with that idea. But basically you ship them for knives or something and they sharpen them and then they send the knife back to you. Interesting. What would you pay for a service like that? Let's see. You can do it. Her knife, but I will say that the minimum is four knives. I don't have, I have four nights. That's what I'm saying. What's funny is that, so I considered, because I consider doing a a knife as one of the ones, the Mies and knife, cause I actually bought an Instagram knife that was marketed towards me. Yeah. Because I was like, oh these nights I had, I got it from Costco and they're just not really great. Maybe one really good knife, you know. But that's it. Like I kind of have like the one good one.
Speaker 1:
2:54
I don't have like a Cutco big shelf and knives. Um, I would pay a maybe 10, 10 bucks at the, at the most, ideally I'd pay five bucks to sharpen each night, but maybe 10 bucks at the most. I could you pay $10 a knife? Maybe I'd say like that's, no, you're on it. So it's 1225 and knife with a minimum four knife. So $50 for four knives. Yeah, that's, that's where you lose me. There is the minimum for four. I and I agree cause I would like buy one knife sharpened. It feels like hey we'll sharpen it for 10 bucks. Okay. Yeah. And it feels like the average recommendation would be that we be average home chef should have one or two nice knives. Sure. It seems just unfathomable to me. And also what to you will be better about shipping your knife to someone to edit cause then you don't have here tonight.
Speaker 1:
3:48
Exactly. Which doesn't look good versus just buying a knife sharpener. Yeah, exactly. I think, I think some nights things come with a little knife sharper that you've got. Yeah. And if you're the type of person who like, oh I gotta get my knife sharpened. Like you have a knife sharpener, you know, or you have enough knives, you're like I don't need to worry about that now. I think it's a bad idea. How long could this company stay? But now, like I said, I got an Instagram ad, they have a great website, they have a whole system, great branding. So they must, there must be people out there. Here's the actually fix this idea. Uh, it would be interesting if when you bought like a Cutco set of colory, you got a coupon for five jurors with knife aid and then you, and then you start to see the value of professional knife sharpening.
Speaker 1:
4:32
So you got, you got some really nice knives, you got five professional knife sharpenings then I could see how that's a good intro to okay. Every, I don't know. How often do you get your six months? I don't know. Every six months I send them off to this company. It's usually a butcher box, I guess. Often [inaudible] right then. Yeah, I think that's a good idea of like, cause I don't think I would, I don't know if I would instinctively like I got to go sharpen my knives right now. I is there a service out there? I've only, I definitively would have no idea if my knife was dull or sharp or anything in between. Um, but had I, if I had the coupon for one free knife sharpening and, and they just said that mean to me, I'll be like, sure, I'll sharpen my knives.
Speaker 1:
5:12
And then, uh, and then I experienced it and it truly was like, oh, I didn't know what I was missing out on. Yeah, yeah. That might lead me in. Um, so what's the name of this company? It is called knifey and I fade. If you're listening, go ahead and start throwing out some coupon debts. And that's a great, I mean a partnership thing is definitely the best idea. Any knife manufacturer, they should just slot in a one free knife. Sharpening. Yeah. Coupon to every package. Exactly. So I had a, I had an ad, um, and, and I, I kinda went through an interesting, first I was like, this is terrible. And then it was a website. I was like, oh, maybe it's not bad. And then I went to a different part of the website. I was like, nope, my instincts was right. This is terrible. Um, and it's not, the actual idea doesn't seem that crazy. So it's a turtle pillow. T R t l pillow. Um,
Speaker 3:
6:00
initially the ad, it's, it's what the website looks like, which is like, it looks like you have a neck brace on. Um, it's a, it's a travel pillow. It's almost more like a, it's like a scarf that you would put around your neck, but it has some sort of like reinforced side to it. So you can kind of like lean one way or the other, like on a plane, which, okay. That's, that's not the worst thing in the world. Right. What happened was when I initially tried to search travel pillow or this, this travel pillow, if you click the travel pillow link, all of a sudden it takes me to a different looking travel pedal that is much more appealing. It is, it looks like a regular, oh, it's like a shirt. It's like a scarf. It doesn't look like a neck brace. That's like not the first thing I see when I go to their main website. It's like this weird medical looking thing. Yeah. So, so I kinda love it. I am completely opposed to you in every single way on this one you're saying you prefer the middle of the great looking I, here's what I'm doing. I'm going to the website, I'm quantity one add to cart. Checkout is killing this happening, live on live on the podcast. I'm buying one of these. Here's the thing. Uh, I am super, I probably own,
Speaker 4:
7:11
okay,
Speaker 3:
7:12
eight travel pillows, not a joke. I will take a picture. I'll post it in the show notes or whatever. Eight travel pillows because every time, first of all, you forget them every, I forget it obviously, but then I've also, I want to try every single one. So I have like the $60 Hudson news, wine, and I have their $10. I have a lot of travel pillows. And what I hate is in travel pillows, they often are filled with like those BD and the sound of the beads drives me physically insane. So what I love about this is that there's no stuffing components really, and that it clearly, it would provide so much support on your neck or you could just sleep right in a sitting position. You agree with me that like the, at least on the main page it does look like you're wearing a neck brace.
Speaker 3:
7:59
Yeah. But like travel pillows look so stupid no matter what. No matter what the best apple could design a travel pillow, there's just not a lot you can do with it. Um, I'm saying I might get the, the, the travel pillow, the one that doesn't look like the neck brace. I might be like, okay, I could do that. And actually the price point 29 bucks, it's a great price because I be, I can't wait. I can't wait. I'm literally hitting paypal and I'm clicking continue and I'm going to ship it to the office and I'm in a sleep at my desk. I don't think it's necessarily a bad idea. I actually think the price points there and like there clearly is a version here that I would consider buying. I just think that like when I first saw it, I was like, who would buy this neck brace?
Speaker 3:
8:41
And then I went to the website, I was like, oh actually that's not too bad. But then as I poked around, I was like, they're putting the wrong foot forward. They're putting this like weird version forward. They should in my opinion go the other way. Definitely. I think that the branding could be better. But as a travel pillow kind of of sewer, I see so much here. I think I honestly think it looks better than a neck pillow. What about turtle? T? O. T. R. T. L. How do you feel about that new age? A dumb name, but you can't help people. People are going to do that. You got to look past dumb names to get to the brand sometimes. All right. What's, what's, what's your, uh, I think you should get to, uh, yeah, so my second idea was gets the new no show shock. So you open this page and it's kind of like almost like a foot.
Speaker 3:
9:25
Oh, cert. G. E. K. K. S. G. E. K. K. S. So again, a really horrible name, dumb name. And it looks like, I mean it's just hard to explain, but it really just looks like a doctor shows. But with like a little bit of the lip on both sides. Exactly that and they say it's a replacement to no show socks and I can't really figure out how I feel about it. I think they look dumb, but then again, sure they're not meant to be seen. And I will say that no show socks are one of those things where it's like I hate them in some sense because they're always like getting off kilter. I'm always readjusting them. Um, and if I'm wearing shorts and not no shows, I feel like a fool. Yeah. So, so yeah, there's a pain point there. I could say like there's room for improvement. This seems like, I don't know if this would really fix anything.
Speaker 3:
10:16
I guess it doesn't feel, it doesn't really feel sanitary because, so there's no sidewall on like the yeah, it's just, it just seems like it's the F it's like there's a heel wall. Yeah. And then all it really purely a toe is the like foot sole shoe sole barrier. That's the only thing that it really is a, also, I will say that the price is $17 a sock for a pair of socks, not pop per sack. And here's the, here's the other question. It's like, okay, like how often you have to wash this thing. Like with the socks it's easy. It's like once I take, why am I watching this? Every single time you have a pair of Allbirds don't you? I do. Which is advertised as that you don't even need shoes. Exactly. Which it seems like that's a way more innovative way of looking at the world.
Speaker 3:
11:02
Just wash your shoes. Exactly. Way, way more interesting. I think that the solution to the, the no stench problem. I don't feel like I have the stinkiest speed in the world, but like you know, they have that spray that like water repels off you. It just seems like we were not too far away from just like we found out, there's a thing saying it's sprinkles in there and like it's just the limited, so just deodorant for your things or whatever. Like that just seems like a better than like this weird shoe insert hybrid things. I'm going to say bad idea. I think so too. I don't think enough people will get on board and try it though. I think if they sent me one I'd probably, maybe, maybe they changed my mind, but yeah, I don't, cause I will say, I do think that there are a lot of things wrong with no show socks. I think, um, I bought Bombus, which is like this really highly advertised brand of socks. They're very expensive. I bought them as my new no show and they advertise as like no slap, never rolls down, ever rolls down year.
Speaker 1:
11:54
And I think I hate it. I couldn't imagine anything else. Like I don't believe there is a way to design a no show sock that doesn't just get jammed. Oh, we should find a solution, but this isn't, yes, it's not at all right. I got, I got one last year for you and then maybe we'll move into a speed round of good idea. Bad idea. Um, okay. So this, this was another one where I, I'm, I don't know exactly where I land on this. Um, so the initial ad was for these things called best self courage over comfort deck. So this is a deck of cards that um, you would presumably keep on your desk. Um, and they're kind of like inspirational quotes, but most of them are like prompts and so they would be like, get up and walk around the office. Okay. And then I draw another one that says go say hi to three people. Right. And I, I get the mental health and, and overall health, like that's a good thing. But like this to me, wreaks of like 2001 desk tearaway calendars. Yeah. Just like who is using this, how could anybody use this for more than a week at a time?
Speaker 3:
12:59
I just want to say I use, it's not at my work desk, but my home desk does have a tearaway jeopardy calendar. So I don't appreciate you starting there. That makes me old fashioned. So I get this same ad for best self. Um, and the courage over comfort deck basically like to give you an idea of the kinds of things this has. It's like seeing out loud with your car windows down. It's stuff like that. And I think that this product category, which is like inspirational action products. So I, I bought a couple of years ago like, um, like a letters to yourself pack and a shirt, stupid prompts. And I mean it's just like super obnoxious and annoying. And then of course you never do any of them. They just said that. That's, that's, that's my, my, my problem. What I like is, I mean these are, I love the branding of the products and I think that some of these other ones, like they have our wordsmith deck that looks like it's writing prompts. That's interesting. Yeah.
Speaker 1:
13:50
So, so this is where it came in. I will zoom down. I was like, oh, hold on. There's this other stuff here. Yeah. And the wordsmith deck, the icebreaker deck, like some doesn't ones like, oh, those are actually much more interesting than like the courage. So again, they're putting their worst foot forward in my head.
Speaker 3:
14:03
Yeah. Easily. I think the icebreaker deck is awesome. And I, and I have a product like this now that's just like conversation topics. That's great. And we whip it out like parties. Yeah. It's like you put it, it's like a coffee table thing. Yeah. And it's like what's your dream? [inaudible] they're dumb but they are kind of fun and they're easy. They get conversation. Um, so I would definitely buy like the icebreaker pack, but the like goofy challenges to get, you know, inspired knots. And here's, here's my other problem is that like don't you feel that this would work much better in an app format? I lie like physical, I mean this is the kind of stuff they sell at target, right? Let's try the kind of stuff that you put on your coffee table. A so I think an app is a good maybe. Yeah,
Speaker 1:
14:48
we look for specifically the courage one. If I got a reminder this like, Hey Scott, like you should try doing this today. And then I've got another one at the end of the day, head blow off and reminder and delete the app because that's so annoying. I'm just saying like if you're, if you're looking for encouragement, I would, I would stop using this deck after three days, but I might let the app run for a couple of months before I was like, I can't do that. [inaudible] you're just ignoring the notification you'd let it run because it's not as a noxious as like pulling a card out of a deck, but you're not doing any of the challenges. You might deal them. I think I'd be more inclined to do it with an app. And maybe that's just me. That is definitely you because you're kind of Zany and weird and Whoa. Okay. Shots fired.
Speaker 1:
15:30
Um, all right, let's do a little speed round and then, and then I'm really excited for Andre's idea here. Um, good idea. Bad idea. I think there's going to be a little bit of a trailer seam if I, if I'm not mistaken. So what's your good idea about it? Yeah, you're a, I will fight anyone that tries to tell me that the new cats movie doesn't look good. And here's the reason is all the people online that are like, they look so weird and the CGI of the cats is so strange. You're all idiots. And the reason is is because, have you seen cats? It's a weird musical. Is it? We won. I'm like lottery t I did not buy a ticket to cats and I never would. But we like in Broadway in New York, like you can just enter a lottery and maybe get a ticket.
Speaker 1:
16:13
And we got them two cats when we were there and at intermission we turned to each other and we were like, what is this musical? Why? Like how is this so popular? It's so weird. It's weird. Freaking musical. So the movie is also weird and even in full costume and makeup they still look kind of off putting kind of, yeah, I, so here's the thing, I think there's a couple of weird things. So one, because Andrew Lloyd Webber is like obviously makes nothing but amazing things for the most part, cats, I would say it's one of the weirdest definitely entries. And it's definitely the one that I, if I pretend to know the most about it, I'm like, Oh yeah, of course there's cats and if someone's like, name two songs off gas that I couldn't do it. That's a shame because the music is good.
Speaker 1:
16:57
Sure. Um, and I think you're like, so, so I, I believed that there was no, no live action version of this that would have satisfied no anyone. It was always going to be like, oh Whoa, but I still want a live action version. I still think it could be a really fun movie and it's going to expose so many people to the creepy weirdness that is cats. Here's this is actually, I think the true problem. I think people are thinking that the issue is the CGI wouldn't actually, I think it's a casting issue personally or it could just be that the source material is challenging. Well, no, because this is what, this is my problem. Well, as I watched it, I was like, okay, I'm not totally not bought into it. And then I see James Cordon and I see fat Amy and it looks like they're in a cat costume just playing themselves.
Speaker 1:
17:41
Right. And I'm like, I don't want to see this. Yeah. I, if they had done so, do you think it would've been better if they had gone? No name, no name? Maybe one keep Judi. Exactly. Sure. Nobody knows what Judi Dench looks like. Taylor swift, I'm fine with because it's like she's not a traditional actress. Yeah, but like, I don't know. I see what you mean. Which is that you, somebody says this cat is James Corden and now you're seeing the James Corden features. Whereas if you didn't know the actor or actress, you might be more accommodating to just understand that it's a cat. Absolutely. Kind of agreed, but then nobody would see it if there's no star power because it's a weird musical that nobody wants to see. It is weird. Yeah. Anyway, that's, that's my take on it. It's like, I think it's fine. It's whatever. Like this is the cat's controversial in the theater realm.
Speaker 1:
18:28
It's always going to be controversial. I'm sure that there are Broadway fans that are driving to my house to kill me right now. They're like, Katz is dare work of art. It's weird. The funniest thing, I actually think about this as so, so my, my, uh, counter to this is the top gun to trailer, which if you ever wanna have two trailers that were so representative of the, the, the political divide, you'd have the very liberal artistic cats on one side and then Muchow military top gun too on the other side. And like based on like who's posting what and commenting a lot. Like it's like, oh, I wonder, like, it's almost as if there's a connection there between the left and the right. Right. Um, interesting dynamic, you know, but a top gun to, um, haven't seen top gun. I said this to Scott and he gave me a bad look earlier, but my understanding is that the original top gun came out a really long time ago.
Speaker 1:
19:21
It did longer than people think. And it is in of the era of like big time campy. Yeah. That we are totally okay with. But if you rewatch shotgun, you're like, man, this is cheese ball city. Like very over the top acting and dialogue, which when we watch movies from the eighties that's what we expect to see. That's what you want. Right? And in the modern era, this is my problem. And you brought this point up with space jam, which is just like shit, should you make a space jam too? Should you make you an ITI to, did we really need a top gun too? Yeah. Maverick Madigan idea. I don't think it's a great idea. Um, I think it's going to be well made. Tom Cruise generally he makes more bucks. Well he makes more, more, he makes more good movies that he makes bad movies. As far as like crowd crowd pleasers, like sure.
Speaker 1:
20:12
Like it's rarely like he has like a big bomb, right? Maybe the mummy was this most recent bond, but like all the mission impossibles and mommy was real bad. It was real bad. But all the mission impossibles are all like everybody generally likes them. The lowest common denominator of society loves talker. He is a popcorn, just generic action star. Right. So, so I think this movie will be like, this is kind of a, it's a pseudo like serious role. I, I have a hard time seeing this. Anywhere above a 60% are rotten tomatoes. I would have rather, uh, a, I would rather a top top gun ask movie set in the universe
Speaker 3:
20:49
where Tom Cruise is featured briefly. And, but it's about something else. Yeah, I've seen top gun one. I honestly think you do because based on the trailer it's like they, there's volleyball references and there's all these references people who are dead and it's like, why are you still this? Like, I don't think you can watch one without the other because a lot of them, I think they're really leaning into like nostalgia on this. Okay. Do you think it's time on? I think it's time and I'm really an Ike. I actually have butterflies in my stomach right now. Here's, this is the one thing we've changed, um, for the format here. So instead of one of us just pitching this, this idea, we're actually gonna make a, uh, a slideshow presentation with build up. And then we're gonna put it on the website so you can kind of see the pitch deck.
Speaker 3:
21:34
So this is the first one. So give Andre a little bit of slack. I can make some improvements here. Maybe some like app images. I do not think that I could sell this to an investor at the current stage. That doesn't mean it's not a good idea. Oh, I like, I like what I'm seeing so far. I just open it up. So it's, I'm a clerical here. So let's set the stage. A couple of statistics where you hit me with them. 43.1 million people currently live in apartments, apartment buildings wearing on the complexes. Wow. Multifamily housing. Okay. 36% of workers participate in the quote Unquote Gig economy. Uber or Lyft Door Dash. These different jobs that are like jobs that are just quick get money jobs, not hourly kind of rate based jobs. No experience. Really. No. Anybody can do license. Exactly. Um, but there's 140% growth and work from home opportunities.
Speaker 3:
22:25
So people, we know, people want to work from home more and more. That's probably only going to go up and up and up. Totally. And I think that there's maybe an interesting cross section of um, gig economy is generally people with certain uh, careful. Andre definitely, definitely certain restrictions. There's a reason that they maybe couldn't work a nine to five in some cases. Other people enjoy freedom and all these other things. Um, but then maybe it is a job you could like tack on as well as job. It's like, Oh yeah, I cannot do this cause I x, Y and z. So this is having a kid that has to totally right. And I think that I door dash fairly regularly and a lot of people just have interesting circumstances totally. But we know for sure that there are people who maybe are unable to leave the home from work for work but want money, um, but can't really participate in the GIG economy.
Speaker 3:
23:10
They can't go drive Uber. Um, so where I've landed is I think that there is a major problem, which is that scheduling home services or I sox, like I recently scheduled a plumber and it was really painful. Um, I have like a cleaner calm and it's really, really, and if they're great, like, and they're well established service there and knowing that you would definitely know, but it's still like texting them like what's the door code? Oh, it's a new person today. They don't know how to find your house. And it's like I live in a complex so it's actually really challenging to find where you live. Um, but at my old apartment we had like trash valet, so I just put my trash outside the door and it just disappeared day. Right. Which I thought was really, really cool. Um, and there are a million home tasks that I hate doing.
Speaker 3:
23:51
I hate doing laundry, I hate finding someone to feed my cat. I really hate the scheduling and calling and back and forth to get someone to my apartment. And I hate paying somebody to drive to my house, to feed my cat and then leave. And I think do that's really efficient. So I think the Gig economy but in your apartment complex. So here's the thought is at my old apartment complex, I was probably 50 to 60 units, so we would call it like a mid size apartment. Okay. Um, I'm positive that there were stay at home moms or um, elderly, retired people that would do my laundry for me basically like that, that's the most critical service in the world. Or take your trash out or feed your cat or totally right. And like, luckily I had a neighbor that was my cat. But how easy if I got to hop on an app and for like $3 find somebody in my apartment though will walk up a flight of stairs, feed my cat, and then walk home to the walk home.
Speaker 3:
24:42
Right? And, and there are people that are home all day, every day that are like, okay, I got a three year old kid. I can't really lead this, but I could go pick up a laundry hamper outside of somebody's door, wash it, fold it, and then put it back at the end of the day. Totally and I could make $15 doing it. And how awesome would that be for me not to have to leave, not to acquire a new skill, but just use the services and things that are already at my house and then do them and it'll people that are the, for the other people that the people that are out working and maybe you're being supported but you just want some extra income. Or maybe this is like, okay, this is how I pay my rent is like I just hang out at home. I wash 10 people's laundry, I put it back, I take out some trash, I maybe I go in, I scrub the sink, I feed a dog, I feed a cat and I make just some side income.
Speaker 3:
25:28
The light bulb change, a light bulb, like whatever. Right. And, and I think, and then there's other people like me, like I am working professional. What about just about, I want to do these things. What about like there's something up really high in the cabinet and I just do that tall person. Exactly right. And so bucks, it's like I'd pay somebody two bucks to like help me, help me hang this painting. Yeah. So here's the, um, the strengths are that I do think that there is a demand. I think when I look at all these, um, subscription boxes and getting things delivered and I look at the Gig economy and I look at doordash and I think that people maybe aren't becoming lazier but are choosing to spend their time in different ways. Right? I think we live in a, we live in a surplus economy.
Speaker 3:
26:05
Like we are, we have more money than we like to do with exactly. Almost inventing problems because it's like, well, we have all this affluence. What do we do? And so I think people can take advantage of that, which is why the ski company is so effective. Right? Yeah. I think that there's some opportunity here. Um, I drink, it's just like low service, low effort in home services by people that are already there. The, the spirits that you had last time were I said to you, I'm a little worried you're gonna, you're gonna Poopoo this idea. You had that same sentiment to me, which is like, I think this is going to suck. This might be a bomb. This might be a bomb. Not so Andre. I love it. It's a good idea. It is a
Speaker 1:
26:44
great idea. Yeah. Um, I think there's some, like you, you'd really have to iron out. Oh, I have holes and we can talk to those too. But, but, but the, the idea that, you know, cause I have a wife who I think about southern, she's like, I want to contribute, I want to, I want to help. Yeah. And it's like, but I can't go get a w have some new kids. I have two kids. Right. And it's like the times in which they, that she could do something are so limited. Right? Yeah. But there are not times there are these like small windows. If, let's say we live in an apartment complex and the same scenario, if all she had, if their kids were down and she just had to go pick up 10 bags of trash all along the hallway or do laundry that she's going to be doing anyway, but with 10 other people.
Speaker 1:
27:26
Absolutely. And like even if all you bring on a ton of money but it pays for lunch, right. And it's like, okay, now I can get chick-fil-a. Like this makes sense for me. Totally. And it allows you to be like, yeah, I made 15 2050 bucks today. And like that adds up over time. So at the end of the month you're like, yeah, I've been doing this every day. I've got an extra thousand bucks. Maybe that could cover it total. Maybe that could, you know, pay a car payment or it gets you the next step up on something or get you out of the apartment. Right. I love it. I think it's a great, yeah, I think it's a great way to like stay in the current lifestyle that I think so many people have moved into, which is that this gig economy like, yeah. Um, yeah, I'm in on a, I think as I, as I think about like, okay, the, the difference between, you know, something that Uber has an advantage of.
Speaker 1:
28:12
It's like, okay, like you have to have a car of a specific year, which means you have to be responsible enough to have that car. Yeah. You have to pass background check. You have to be able to drive, which means you've gone to driver's Ed. Well, you know, this is just some barriers to get there where it's like one and you don't have a child or a disability or like all these other things that make it challenging. They'll be home for eight hours and drive. Totally. But the flip side of that is like those things qualify someone even if ever so slightly. Whereas like really, I mean just ever so slightly where it's like you could be a freaking closet dweller, you know, just like Weirdo, creepy guy. It's like I can put move someone's trash and it's like you want to make sure there is at least some sort of barrier.
Speaker 1:
28:55
I think, uh, like a government issued id that's maybe getting verified or something, you know, whatever ends up being like, I think that's one concern people have is like, people are generally like, I locked my door for a reason, you know, and I'm like suspicious and like, you know, some people have to feel comfortable and have to feel safe cause you're even that much closer to home. Right. You're not just like in a car somewhere. Like you are like, this is all you need. That's like what's nice about it is that they're that much closer to home. Sure. They're literally your neighbor. Um, which makes it kind of challenging for them to rob you blind. Uh, that's true. That's a fair point. And you have kind of an authority in your world, which is like, you have a office that has their personal information. You have, uh, you know, write them, [inaudible] them for credit. Like in the same way that it's challenging to rent an apartment. So I'm sure
Speaker 3:
29:42
you have somebody that actually has their information on file that lives in the same building. Um, they are your neighbor, which means that they are less likely to rob you because they're going to see you in the parking lot. Like there's like, I think some protections that being said, I want to talk about some of the pains that have been exposed to me and a couple of conversations about this. The first day is like, what is the revenue model? Exactly. The natural conclusion is like, oh, the same way that Uber makes money, they'd take a cut of the fair. Yeah. They make money on every service, but in a way that's not like Uber, they're your neighbor, which it's like, why wouldn't you just, maybe the first transaction is on the platform or the second transaction is like, okay, now just keep doing this and I'll keep [inaudible].
Speaker 3:
30:20
Yeah. Um, so it's like, okay, how does that really work? I think that there are some ways to work with that, which is sure. Um, like airbnb where it's like they offer you some protection of some sort. It's like, okay, we're going to insure you up to 25 k. Um, but only if you do the business on our platform. Um, so I think that's one model. The other model is maybe closer to like next door. So next door is a, a community, um, like social media where you have to actually verify that you live in a certain zip code or something like a localized Facebook, right? Yeah. And you have to prove it. Like you have to have a credit card, the bills to the zip code or you have to send a piece of mail to the just colored shirts, all this different stuff similar to that.
Speaker 3:
30:59
Um, and the way that they make money, there's no costs. They make money, they advertise like local services. Right. And I think that that's possibly another working model where it's like more like an offer up type thing where you're posting the service that you're willing to provide, but only to local people. Um, and then the platform makes money, just an advertising things that are local to you. Right. Which is like, okay, uh, you probably don't want to hire somebody in your building for your plumber, but now we're going to give you ads for services that are close to you and that's how you make money. Do you think, you think any sort of subscription model of like Kate's 15 bucks a month and this gives you access to like 10 jump, three things, two so awesome. 10 jobs or x amount of jobs, you know, and if you want to hire a higher model, 20 bucks a month, then you get access to 20 jobs in a month or whatever.
Speaker 3:
31:42
Yeah. Cause you could probably, you could probably figure out it's, again, I haven't tapped, I need to feed my cat. Okay. A once a week or you know, where you can't, you know, or you know how things have to do them alone. Like you could probably calculate it up. Um, so that could be another potential way. Totally. Um, which would be awesome and I would love that. The other way is some sort of like Angie's list type of thing where it's like you have to pay to get into the circle. It's like a one time thing and maybe like some sort of membership thing and at that point if you wanna make your deals beyond that, that's your brother. But like you paid to get access to the network. Yeah. A higher premium up front be 50 bucks and then yeah, like you pay and then if you want to go offline you can but like pay to get in type of thing. Totally. Which could totally work. Also, I think the third model that I may be the least confident in is like all of these uh, apartments, townhomes, whatever, have like generally like a portal, like a rent portal. Sure. Um, and that's like a software service, like a SAS company. They're typically paying and they manage your rent payments and your
Speaker 1:
32:40
collections and all this stuff. Yeah. Maybe it's like an add on there where it's like your landlord actually pays like a flat fee, like $200 to make this service available to his tenants. Oh yeah. It's a potential option. I don't know. Who knows what kind of landlord would be willing to like buy in to this kind of new idea. But it could work, which, and I think it would be a huge selling point for me. Like I said, valley trash that's selling point like apartments are like, and we have belly trash. We'll take your trash out and we'll give you a free membership to this [inaudible] this thing which is called, which is called next serve, which I, I'm really not like, I'm sorry. I was like, uh, next door I was trying to get to a name. I spent like six hours trying to think of this for us and I land on next serve, which is total nonsense and probably already used that.
Speaker 1:
33:28
So please workshop the name, but if you can think of a good name for us and send it in. Yeah, go steal this idea.com. Totally. Yeah, you sold me Andre. I think we, I think we still are on a, on a hot streak of good ideas for winners. Yeah, that's big. Um, where do you move into this last segment and then we're gonna wrap up. Last segment here. This is a new one. Uh, this is called the idea gauntlet. Now, a lot of people don't know this. A mutual friend of ours named Romeo butters. He's a philanthropist. He's a billionaire. He, he uh, interjects and he communicates with us very infrequently, but when he does, he, he means business. I Love Romeo, Romeo, he's male, he's a male on male. Amanda, myth and legend. What Romeo has done is individually, he's given me specifically three ideas that he is, he needs to invest in and he's given Andre a hundred thousand dollars and he says, Andre, I need you to make the call and Scott, I need you to pitch the ideas to Andre and I'm just going to choose how, which of these three ideas is the best.
Speaker 1:
34:29
Now there was a theme to these ideas and this idea gauntlet and the theme is peanut butter. Love it. Romeo saw the, the goobers peanut butter in the aisle, the peanut butter that has the jelly and peanut butter inside. And he said, you know, that's an interesting invention. I'm surprised it's still around. I think we all are. No one knows who buys it, but it's still there. And people that are not willing to use two knives. He looked at that and he said that that market needs to be disrupted, the peanut butter market. So I'm gonna present three ideas to you and you tell me which one you think is the best. Where would you invest this? $100,000 all in one. Maybe split it up. Got It. Idea number one, this is called a chapstick peanut butter. It's not what you think. Please no, please don't miss not chapstick within the flavor of peanut butter.
Speaker 1:
35:14
A big calm two. These have the same problem, which is that peanut butter drops from notorious and getting the peanut butter out becomes exponentially more difficult as you protect more peanut butter. Right. Andrea just did the hand motion. He knows exactly. I'm going to roll up. It's a rollout situation on the bottom of the peanut butter. It's a simple twist function that pushes that peanut butter up to the surface. Okay. That's idea number one. Got It. Idea number two, this is called uh, the, uh, the, the, the peanut butter, the peanut butter screw jar. So in a similar way. Sounds like the same. Yeah, it's very similar in a similar fashion. So instead of having a mechanism which could be more costly, um, the jar itself, every inch and a half, you're able to unscrew that part of the jar. And so it's basically like five inch and a half plastic pieces that are all stacked on top of each other, filled with peanut butter.
Speaker 1:
36:10
The cap goes on top and you can just basically take off an inch and a half as you get down the jar down to that last inch. Should I have kind of never have to scrape? That's idea number two. Idea number three, this is travel PB and j. So you're camping, you're going out and about. There's not a good way to bring peanut butter and Jelly. Peanut butter comes in a big jar. Jelly comes in a big jar oftentimes. So you can get these small little portions which aren't really helpful or you get PB and j in the container of toothpaste that can fit in your toiletries bag. You could spread it very easily on an ice, on a nice thing of bread. It's, it's positioned. You buy it at Rei. It's, this is like a fun like travel thing. Get that protein style there. A, it's kind of a unique oh yeah. PB and j on the go, like on camping, on road trips, on whatever. Like it fits anywhere. Those are this your ideas and Andre rank them and, and, and invest.
Speaker 3:
37:05
All right, I'm calling up my friend Romeo. Uh, and I'm saying lose Scott as your idea, man. All three are losers and I'll, I'll do them real quick. One, uh, peanut butter chapstick. It won't physically work because peanut butter, as we all know, if you ever put a knife in a jar of peanut butter, you understand why there's no way that any twist mechanism is gonna push my hands for the top. It's just going to get jammed. Like it would be so hard. So a jar, peanut butter twist mechanism out physically won't work. The second idea is just confusing to me. I don't know. Like, give me the pitch again because so take a peanut butter jar. Yeah. So this is that this literally happened at my last job. So as the peanut per jar went down, somebody would physically take a knife. Yeah, probably sharpened by knife aid and they would cut the jar in half and then you can get to the bottom, you get to the bottom.
Speaker 3:
37:57
So instead of that, which is insane, what if instead the jar itself was made so that you don't have the top pads like the place we can screw in the lid, that same top but every two inches down. So you could literally unscrew it, inch of plastic off of it, and then screw the top back on. So now it's half the size. Now, bad idea. If, I mean, what peanut butter company is going to invest in this bizarre jar mechanism doesn't make sense, especially to solve the problem, which is like, it's annoying to get to the bottom of the jar. Like just make the, I mean there's so many solutions that are lower tech, like make the jar flare out at the top or something like that. 100 things that work than the, the six tier jars like Russia doll situation. I hate it. Um, the third idea already exists.
Speaker 3:
38:44
So I'm going to say Romeo, just invest like there's already like go tubes of peanut butter that you can buy in like this from Merkin aisle. Yeah. But peanut butter and Jelly. Oh I know enough jelly. I mean that we're just a goober 2.0 which is not a winner either. Um, so I love Rei. Yeah. As a, as a camping tool. As a potentially as a camping tool. Cause here's the, what happened to me is that like we went on a little camping trip and I literally bought a, I brought my full thing of peanut butter jelly. Took up space in my cooler. Yeah. It was like, I was like, oh it was a knife. I don't have one. If I just had a little like I could chuck it in there and just like just pour it on there, spread with my finger. And again, it, I just don't think peanut butter, peanut butter is a thick, dense substance.
Speaker 3:
39:27
It's not going to come out of a tube when you squeeze. Sure. It would test it. Go Fred thing, listen, go home, get a ziplock bag. And then first just to demonstrate how challenging this would be, you're going to take a spatula or a knife or whatever and ladle all of the peanut butter into the Ziploc bag and then cut a little hole and then try to squeeze peanut butter out of the hall. It won't work. It'll work. It won't work. It'll work. I will take a video that'll prove you wrong on this one, so what you're saying is Roman needs to keep his money for the next idea. Guy And I now I want it to be as supportive of you as you work me when those were three, not good peanut butter. None of these were my ideas. These are ideas that I've heard of.
Speaker 3:
40:10
These are Romeo's ideas. I'm just pitching. No, these are not my ideas. These are one of them was John's idea. Won't tell you now. There was a friend of mine, I won't tell you who, and then the other one was actually I guess technically the they took out when I was like, oh, that could be an interesting one. Yeah. All great people. I'm sure I'm positive and they're all really smart too. They're gonna be really upset when they hear this. And so please rate our podcast, my stars before you do that. But I'm sure these are good ideas. Go out and test them. Like go out, maybe like put together the one and prove me wrong 100% if you believe premier, if you believe there's probably a reason these things don't exist, it's what you're saying. No, because they're all super innovative ideas. I'm not surprised that Jeff hasn't like product tested some of these things.
Speaker 3:
40:52
I just don't think that on face they sound like a logical solution. Okay. All right, well let's get to wrap it up for idea guidelines and the show. That's it. I'm gonna give it for, give everybody the, uh, ways to get in touch with us. Yes. So to see notes and links related to the show Goto, go steal this idea.com where we post the show notes and other details. And I'm gonna post a video of me squeezing peanut butter out of the zip lock bag for the picture of your eight and fellow. Right. Hey, I went and I did order that I really, really did. Um, so that should be at my house and five to seven business days, and I will take a video or email us@anideaatgostealthisidea.com. Uh, typically on these episodes, we do a mailbag. We'd like to you talk through your ideas and should him down just like a dead, the peanut butter idea. Unless they repeat it back, unless you, that's the lion's dead. If you've got a peanut butter idea, get prepared and don't come at me, uh, or, uh, chat us at Twitter at Gusto, this idea and a, that's gonna do it. That's gonna do it. We'll see you next time. Signing off.
Speaker 2:
42:17
[inaudible] [inaudible].
×

Listen to this podcast on